American Educator: Winter 2001

  • Something There Is That Doesn't Love a List

    Carol Jago

    In his poem "Mending Wall," Robert Frost explores our love/hate relationship with walls. On the one hand, we believe that "good fences make good neighbors." At the same time, we worry about who is being walled in and walled out. Book lists inspire a similar ambivalence. No sooner is one...

  • Cheating

    Why Students Do It and How We Can Help Them Stop Donald McCabe

    School cheating is not news. Parents and teachers have been worrying about it for generations. Unfortunately, there is evidence that cheating has increased in the last few decades, and the Internet is likely to intensify the problem. It's also unfortunate that the people who worry about cheating...

  • A National Anthem Is Born

    The War of 1812 is the only time in our history that the United States was invaded by a foreign power. The war saw American troops decisively defeated by the British at the Battle of Bladensburg, near Washington, D.C., the flight of President James Madison and his wife Dolley, and the...

  • Making Standards Matter, 2001

    The AFT was an early advocate for standards-based education. In 1992, in response to national concerns that students in the United States were not learning enough to compete in a global economy and that there was an intolerable gap between the achievement of whites and blacks, the late Albert...

  • Why Science Should Warm Our Hearts

    Colin Tudge

    I love science. It is what I have always done. I remember the warmth I nursed for weeks when, aged 13, I qualified for an advanced science program, already specializing at that tender age. I can still get the same thrill from some books and laboratories, when ideas are neat and properly...

  • A Confrontation with the Past

    The Japanese Textbook Dispute Burton Bollag