American Educator: Fall 2001

  • Ways to Get Started Using Technology with Your Students

    Ellen Ficklen, Carol Muscara

    Great, you've decided that technology can help you teach your students. But then what? How do you move from the theoretical concept of "technology in the classroom" to making sure that your students end up with accurate, substantive, quality information on their computer screens? Here are three...

  • Oliver Goldsmith Comes to Nigeria

    Pages from a Teacher's Journal Barbara Grant Nnoka

    December 1958: Just exactly two months ago, I came back to Nigeria from a five-month holiday among friends in the U.S., and when I arrived at the boys' secondary school where I teach English, I was two days late for the first classes of the third and last term of the year. In...

  • Steady Work

    The Story of Connecticut's School Reform

    To appreciate Connecticut's school reform effort, which is described in the following article, it helps to take a stroll past some landmarks in recent education history.

    The Connecticut reform got started four years before the Education Summit of 1989, presided over...

  • The School Marketplace

    Has Commercialization Gone Too Far? Alexander Wohl

    It's a crisp fall morning in our nation's heartland. The smell of autumn fills the air with a distinctive scent that can mean only one thing—the end of summer vacation and the first day of school. Teachers eagerly anticipate the new crop of students, the clean classrooms, and the blackboards on...

  • Lessons From the Analog World

    What Tomorrow's Classrooms Can Learn from Today Kevin Bushweller

    I love watching my parents master new technologies. First it was word processing and e-mail. Then digital photography and cell phones. A computer mouse once baffled my father—now he uses it as naturally as a steering wheel. When my mother began using e-mail, she would send a message, then pick...

  • Keep the Faucet Flowing

    Summer Learning and Home Environment

    The findings in the article that follows are based on the authors’ Baltimore School Study, which began in 1982 and is still in progress. Entwisle, Alexander, and Olson chose twenty schools on the basis of their racial composition (six were predominantly African American, six predominantly...

  • Closing the Achievement Gap

    Sandra Feldman

    Over the last four decades, we’ve significantly narrowed the achievement gap between poor and middle-class children: Reading and math scores are up; more young people are going on to college; public schools are keeping pace with the explosion of knowledge in the Information Age. There is much...

  • Harnessing Technology in the Classroom

    Ellen Ficklen, Carol Muscara

    Don't panic. Yes, this is an article about technology, but it's not written for computer experts. Even if you consider yourself a long way from being on the information highway—does a dirt path sound more like it?—what you'll find here starts with basic technology information, builds from there...

  • Going on a Webquest

    Ellen Ficklen, Carol Muscara

    Doesn't it seem that sometimes technology provides us with just too much information? By now, most of us have had the experience of searching for information on the Internet, only to be presented with a list of 20,000,000 items (give or take a few thousand) that we can look through. But don't...

  • Tips from the Trenches

    (Or How Not to Reinvent the Wheel) Ellen Ficklen, Carol Muscara

    It's easy to feel overwhelmed by technology. And the more people tell you that technology is wonderful, the more you wonder what the catch is. Of course there is a catch. Technology isn't the answer to all of education's problems, and figuring out which problems technology is able to...