AFT - American Federation of Teachers

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Press Release

 

FOR RELEASE:
September 11, 2012

 

CONTACT:

Janet Bass
202-879-4554
jbass@aft.org
www.aft.org

 

 

Share My Lesson Website Offers One Lucky Registrant $5,000 Toward Student Loans

WASHINGTON—Share My Lesson, the online collection of teaching resources created by the American Federation of Teachers and TES Connect, announced a new contest today that brings attention to the website and to the problem of student debt.

Student loan debt has piled up to an astounding $1 trillion, leaping over all other household debt, including credit card and housing obligations. The average student debt burden is about $23,000, with 10 percent of borrowers owing more than $54,000 and 3 percent more than $100,000. The problem is particularly acute for teachers, who have an average starting salary of $30,000, lower than other white-collar professions.

Share My Lesson has more than 255,000 teaching materials for educators who register, all free of charge. These resources include grade-specific curricula, lesson plans, quizzes and interactive resources for grades pre-K through college. In addition, Share My Lesson has targeted materials to assist teachers with teaching to the Common Core State Standards in their lessons, now required in 46 states and the District of Columbia.

To promote Share My Lesson (www.sharemylesson.com), we will enter all registrants who have registered by Oct. 31 into a drawing. The winner will receive their choice of $5,000 to be used to help pay off their student loan debt or a $3,500 Visa cash card.

"Teachers want and need the resources, tools and time to help their students succeed. Share My Lesson is a voluminous collection of online teaching materials by teachers, for teachers—and for free," said AFT President Randi Weingarten. "When teachers share their best practices and ideas, it's a win-win for teachers and their students."

 

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The AFT represents 1.5 million pre-K through 12th-grade teachers; paraprofessionals and other school-related personnel; higher education faculty and professional staff; federal, state and local government employees; nurses and healthcare workers; and early childhood educators.