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Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

70 percent of educators and school staff in AL reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 25 percent of AL teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 55 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 75 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 25 percent of AL educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 35 percent of educators in AL said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 15 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 60 percent of educators in AL said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In AL, educators reported getting an average of 6.6 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. AL teachers and school staff also reported an average of 12 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 20 percent of educators in AL agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In AL, 45 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Alabama Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,473

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 40
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Alabama Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 18.25

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 43
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Alabama Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $50,239

Rank of State for 2018: 40
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Alabama State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,764

Rank of State for 2017: 23
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Alabama Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,530

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 17
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,487

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 19

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Alabama Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -5.3%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 19
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Alabama, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Doug Jones did not vote on the decision to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Jones also did not cast a vote on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, the tax plan, Betsy DeVos’ nomination, and ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Jeff Sessions did not vote on the decision to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Sessions also did not cast a vote on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, the tax plan, and whether to end requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety. Session backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination.

Sen. Richard C. Shelby voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Shelby also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Shelby also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Luther Strange voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Strange also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts/ Strange also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety. Strange did not vote on Betsy DeVos’ nomination.

Rep. Robert B. Aderholt voted not to restore funds to community schools. Aderholt also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Aderholt also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mo Brooks voted not to restore funds to community schools. Brooks also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brooks also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Brooks did not vote on the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy

Rep. Bradley Byrne voted not to restore funds to community schools. Byrne also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Byrne also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Gary Palmer voted not to restore funds to community schools. Palmer also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Palmer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Martha Roby voted not to restore funds to community schools. Roby also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Roby also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike D. Rogers voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rogers also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rogers also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Terri A. Sewell voted to restore funds to community schools. Sewell also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sewell also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In AL, voter participation dropped 43 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in AL.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 3,109,249 in AL.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 912,194 in AL.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 332,099 more people in AL to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 22-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
AL General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,961,601 276,532
Presidential Turnout 2,105,522 458,572
Midterm Turnout 1,205,162 145,579
# of Drop-Off Voters

900,360 312,993

Gov
Solid R: Ivey - R

 
 

 
 

 
 

AL

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Alaska Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $17,960

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 6
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Alaska Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 16.91

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 40
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Alaska Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $69,474

Rank of State for 2018: 8
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Alaska State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $18,500

Rank of State for 2017: 1
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Alaska Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,438

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 43
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: N/A

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018:

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Alaska Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -73.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015:
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Alaska, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Lisa Murkowski voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Murkowski also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Murkowski also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Dan Sullivan voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Sullivan also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Sullivan did not vote in the decision ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Don Young voted to restore funds to community schools. Young also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Young also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In AK, voter participation dropped 16 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in AK.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 517,165 in AK.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 75,868 in AK.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 35,290 more people in AK to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 7-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
AK General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 344,111 43,321
Presidential Turnout 310,561 42,106
Midterm Turnout 261,324 36,959
# of Drop-Off Voters

49,237 5,147

Gov
Toss Up: Walker (I)

 
 

 
 

 
 

AK

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

77 percent of educators and school staff in AZ reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 46 percent of AZ teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 88 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 85 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 42 percent of AZ educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 35 percent of educators in AZ said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 2 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 50 percent of educators in AZ said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In AZ, educators reported getting an average of 6.1 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. AZ teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in AZ agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In AZ, 35 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Arizona Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $7,809

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 49
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Arizona Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 23.13

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 50
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Arizona Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $47,746

Rank of State for 2018: 46
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Arizona State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $2,975

Rank of State for 2017: 50
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Arizona Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $11,218

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 14
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $2,606

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 45

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Arizona Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -7.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 45
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Arizona, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Jeff Flake voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Flake also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Flake did not vote on ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. John McCain voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. McCain also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. McCain also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Andy Biggs voted not to restore funds to community schools. Biggs also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Biggs also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Trent Franks voted not to restore funds to community schools. Franks also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Franks also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Franks did note vote on the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy

Rep. Ruben Gallego voted to restore funds to community schools. Gallego also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gallego also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Paul Gosar voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gosar was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gosar also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Gosar did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction.

Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva voted to restore funds to community schools. Grijalva also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Grijalva also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Martha McSally voted not to restore funds to community schools. McSally also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McSally also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom O'Halleran voted to restore funds to community schools. O'Halleran also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. O'Halleran also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Schweikert voted not to restore funds to community schools. Schweikert also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schweikert also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema voted to restore funds to community schools. Sinema also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sinema also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In AZ, voter participation dropped 41 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in AZ.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,373,244 in AZ.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,109,248 in AZ.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 443,024 more people in AZ to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
AZ General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,381,344 610,990
Presidential Turnout 2,669,372 520,459
Midterm Turnout 1,574,699 169,657
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,094,673 350,802

Gov
Likely R: Ducey - R

Sen
Toss up: Open

House
Likely D: 09 - OPEN
Lean D: 01 - O'Halleran / 02 - OPEN
Likely R: 06 - Schweikert

 
 

AZ

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

92 percent of educators and school staff in AR reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 33 percent of AR teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 67 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 100 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 50 percent of AR educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 33 percent of educators in AR said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 8 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 33 percent of educators in AR said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In AR, educators reported getting an average of 6.3 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. AR teachers and school staff also reported an average of 14 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in AR agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In AR, 67 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Arkansas Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,099

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 36
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Arkansas Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.75

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 16
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Arkansas Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $49,017

Rank of State for 2018: 43
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Arkansas State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,483

Rank of State for 2017: 17
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Arkansas Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,553

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 34
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,645

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 35

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Arkansas Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 1.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 35
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In AR, voter participation dropped 19 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in AR.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,907,892 in AR.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 489,922 in AR.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 217,717 more people in AR to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
AR General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,511,203 231,190
Presidential Turnout 1,128,946 221,289
Midterm Turnout 914,442 162,132
# of Drop-Off Voters

214,504 59,157

Gov
Solid R: Hutchinson - R

 
 

House
Lean R: 02 Hill

 
 

AR

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

74 percent of educators and school staff in CA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 54 percent of CA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 60 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 88 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 51 percent of CA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 43 percent of educators in CA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 23 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 42 percent of educators in CA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In CA, educators reported getting an average of 6.7 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. CA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 39 percent of educators in CA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In CA, 42 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

California Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,790

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 23
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

California Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 23.63

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 51
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

California Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $81,126

Rank of State for 2018: 2
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

California State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,786

Rank of State for 2017: 15
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

California Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,680

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 24
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $1,430

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 49

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

California Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -3.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 49
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In California, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Dianne Feinstein voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Feinstein also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Feinstein also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Kamala Harris voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Harris also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Harris also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Pete Aguilar voted to restore funds to community schools. Aguilar also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Aguilar also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Nanette Barragán voted to restore funds to community schools. Barragán also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Barragán also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Karen Bass voted to restore funds to community schools. Bass also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bass also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Xavier Becerra did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Becerra also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ami Bera voted to restore funds to community schools. Bera also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bera also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Julia Brownley voted to restore funds to community schools. Brownley also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brownley also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ken Calvert voted not to restore funds to community schools. Calvert also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Calvert also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Salud Carbajal voted to restore funds to community schools. Carbajal also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Carbajal also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Judy Chu voted to restore funds to community schools. Chu also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Chu also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Paul Cook voted not to restore funds to community schools. Cook also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cook also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lou Correa voted to restore funds to community schools. Correa also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Correa also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Costa did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Costa also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction or changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Costa opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Tony Cárdenas voted to restore funds to community schools. Cárdenas also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cárdenas also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Susan A. Davis voted to restore funds to community schools. Davis also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Davis also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark DeSaulnier voted to restore funds to community schools. DeSaulnier also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DeSaulnier also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jeff Denham voted not to restore funds to community schools. Denham also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Denham also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Anna G. Eshoo voted to restore funds to community schools. Eshoo also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Eshoo also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Garamendi voted to restore funds to community schools. Garamendi also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Garamendi also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jimmy Gomez voted to restore funds to community schools. Gomez voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, and opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Gomez did not vote on the decision to repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Jared Huffman voted to restore funds to community schools. Huffman also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Huffman also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Duncan Hunter voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hunter also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hunter also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Darrell Issa voted not to restore funds to community schools. Issa also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Issa also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ro Khanna voted to restore funds to community schools. Khanna also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Khanna also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Knight voted not to restore funds to community schools. Knight also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Knight also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Doug LaMalfa voted not to restore funds to community schools. LaMalfa also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. LaMalfa also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Barbara Lee voted to restore funds to community schools. Lee also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lee also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ted Lieu voted to restore funds to community schools. Lieu also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lieu also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren voted to restore funds to community schools. Lofgren also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lofgren also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Alan Lowenthal voted to restore funds to community schools. Lowenthal also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lowenthal also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Doris Matsui voted to restore funds to community schools. Matsui also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Matsui also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kevin McCarthy voted not to restore funds to community schools. McCarthy also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McCarthy also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom McClintock voted not to restore funds to community schools. McClintock also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McClintock also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jerry McNerney voted to restore funds to community schools. McNerney also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McNerney also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Grace F. Napolitano voted to restore funds to community schools. Napolitano also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, (was in favor of) the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Napolitano also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Devin Nunes voted not to restore funds to community schools. Nunes also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Nunes also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jimmy Panetta voted to restore funds to community schools. Panetta also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Panetta also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi voted to restore funds to community schools. Pelosi also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pelosi also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Scott Peters voted to restore funds to community schools. Peters also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Peters also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rohrabacher also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rohrabacher also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard voted to restore funds to community schools. Roybal-Allard also voted (to cut) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Roybal-Allard also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ed Royce voted not to restore funds to community schools. Royce also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Royce also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Raul Ruiz voted to restore funds to community schools. Ruiz also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ruiz also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Adam B. Schiff voted to restore funds to community schools. Schiff also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schiff also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brad Sherman voted to restore funds to community schools. Sherman also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sherman also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jackie Speier voted to restore funds to community schools. Speier also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Speier also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Eric Swalwell voted to restore funds to community schools. Swalwell also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Swalwell also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Linda T. Sánchez voted to restore funds to community schools. Sánchez also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sánchez also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark Takano voted to restore funds to community schools. Takano also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Takano also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Thompson voted to restore funds to community schools. Thompson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Thompson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Norma J. Torres voted to restore funds to community schools. Torres also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Torres also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Valadao voted not to restore funds to community schools. Valadao also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Valadao also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Juan C. Vargas voted to restore funds to community schools. Vargas also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Vargas also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mimi Walters voted not to restore funds to community schools. Walters also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walters also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Maxine Waters voted to restore funds to community schools. Waters also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Waters also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In CA, voter participation dropped 49 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 4 AFT members running in CA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 20,182,986 in CA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 5,414,217 in CA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 2,976,335 more people in CA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 22-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
CA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 15,527,789 3,060,638
Presidential Turnout 14,325,682 3,528,953
Midterm Turnout 7,375,971 922,573
# of Drop-Off Voters

6,949,711 2,606,380

Gov
Solid D: Open - D

Sen
Solid D: Feinstein - D

House
Likely D: 07 - Bera; Republican Toss Up: 10 - Denham, 25 - Knight. 39 - OPEN, 48 - Rohrabacher, 49 - OPEN
Lean R: 21 - Valadao / 45 - Walters
Likely R: 04 - McClintock / 50 - Hunter

Super of ED
 

CA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

73 percent of educators and school staff in CO reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 51 percent of CO teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 70 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 86 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 49 percent of CO educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 41 percent of educators in CO said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 46 percent of educators in CO said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In CO, educators reported getting an average of 6.7 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. CO teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 49 percent of educators in CO agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In CO, 35 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Colorado Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,821

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 39
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Colorado Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 17.36

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 41
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Colorado Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $52,389

Rank of State for 2018: 32
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Colorado State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $4,787

Rank of State for 2017: 46
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Colorado Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,797

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 15
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,458

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 20

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Colorado Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 3.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 20
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Colorado, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Michael Bennet voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Bennet also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Bennet also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Cory Gardner voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Gardner also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Gardner also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Ken Buck voted not to restore funds to community schools. Buck also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Buck also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Coffman voted not to restore funds to community schools. Coffman also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Coffman also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Diana DeGette voted to restore funds to community schools. DeGette also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DeGette also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Doug Lamborn voted not to restore funds to community schools. Lamborn also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lamborn also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ed Perlmutter voted to restore funds to community schools. Perlmutter also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Perlmutter also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jared Polis voted to restore funds to community schools. Polis also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Polis also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Scott Tipton voted to restore funds to community schools. Tipton also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Tipton also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In CO, voter participation dropped 29 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in CO.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,038,925 in CO.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,183,898 in CO.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 405,086 more people in CO to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 6-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
CO General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,065,211 454,843
Presidential Turnout 2,833,443 663,232
Midterm Turnout 2,022,340 352,964
# of Drop-Off Voters

811,103 310,268

Gov
Lean D : Open - D

 
 

House
Republican Toss Up: 06 - Coffman

Ballot
Education Funding

CO

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

79 percent of educators and school staff in CT reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 50 percent of CT teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 66 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 90 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 44 percent of CT educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 37 percent of educators in CT said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 9 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 48 percent of educators in CT said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In CT, educators reported getting an average of 6.4 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. CT teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in CT agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In CT, 37 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Connecticut Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $19,445

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 3
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Connecticut Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.29

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 5
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Connecticut Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $73,113

Rank of State for 2018: 5
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Connecticut State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $12,931

Rank of State for 2017: 4
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Connecticut Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,392

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 10
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,306

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 24

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Connecticut Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 7.2%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 24
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Connecticut, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. Christopher S. Murphy & Richard Blumenthal voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Both senators also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. They also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Joe Courtney voted to restore funds to community schools. Courtney also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Courtney also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Rosa DeLauro voted did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. DeLauro voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DeLauro also did not vote in the decision to make changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Elizabeth Esty voted to restore funds to community schools. Esty also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Esty also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Himes voted to restore funds to community schools. Himes also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Himes also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John B. Larson voted to restore funds to community schools. Larson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Larson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In CT, voter participation dropped 35 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 31 AFT members running in CT.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,445,140 in CT.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 575,726 in CT.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 276,003 more people in CT to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 30-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
CT General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,835,229 274,644
Presidential Turnout 1,597,548 296,369
Midterm Turnout 1,046,155 115,091
# of Drop-Off Voters

551,393 181,278

Gov
Toss Up: Open

Sen
Solid D: Murphy - D

House
Likely D: 05 - OPEN

Leg
State Senate

CT

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Delaware Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $15,091

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 12
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Delaware Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.05

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 25
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Delaware Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $60,484

Rank of State for 2018: 14
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Delaware State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,680

Rank of State for 2017: 35
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Delaware Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,267

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 11
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,720

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 14

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Delaware Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -1.7%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 14
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Delaware, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Thomas R. Carper voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Carper also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Carper also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Chris Coons voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Coons also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Coons also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester voted to restore funds to community schools. Rochester also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rochester also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In DE, voter participation dropped 45 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 12 AFT members running in DE.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 663,803 in DE.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 192,721 in DE.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 64,167 more people in DE to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 13-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
DE General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 438,790 64,588
Presidential Turnout 442,118 84,089
Midterm Turnout 241,588 27,002
# of Drop-Off Voters

200,530 57,087

 
 

 
Solid D: Carper - D

 
 

Ballot
Constitutional Amendments

DE

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

78 percent of educators and school staff in FL reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 52 percent of FL teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 78 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 85 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 30 percent of FL educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 33 percent of educators in FL said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 41 percent of educators in FL said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In FL, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. FL teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in FL agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In FL, 40 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Florida Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,149

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 44
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Florida Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.29

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 30
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Florida Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $47,721

Rank of State for 2018: 47
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Florida State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,386

Rank of State for 2017: 29
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Florida Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,363

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 50
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,243

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 39

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Florida Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -21.2%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 39
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Florida, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Bill Nelson voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Nelson also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Nelson also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Marco Rubio voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Rubio also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Rubio also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Gus Bilirakis voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bilirakis also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bilirakis also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Vern Buchanan voted not to restore funds to community schools. Buchanan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Buchanan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kathy Castor voted to restore funds to community schools. Castor also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Castor also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Charlie Crist voted to restore funds to community schools. Crist opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Crist also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Crist did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction,

Rep. Carlos Curbelo voted to restore funds to community schools. Curbelo also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Curbelo also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ron DeSantis voted not to restore funds to community schools. DeSantis also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DeSantis also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Val B. Demings voted to restore funds to community schools. Demings also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Demings also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ted Deutch voted to restore funds to community schools. Deutch also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Deutch also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Diaz-Balart also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Diaz-Balart was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Neal Dunn voted not to restore funds to community schools. Dunn also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Dunn also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lois Frankel voted to restore funds to community schools. Frankel opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Frankel also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Frankel did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction.

Rep. Matt Gaetz voted to restore funds to community schools. Gaetz also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gaetz also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Alcee L. Hastings voted to restore funds to community schools. Hastings also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hastings also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Al Lawson did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Lawson also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did not vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Lawson opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Brian Mast voted to restore funds to community schools. Mast also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mast also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Stephanie Murphy voted to restore funds to community schools. Murphy also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Murphy also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Posey did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Posey also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did not vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Posey was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Tom Rooney voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rooney was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rooney also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Rooney did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction,

Rep. Francis Rooney did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Rooney also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did note vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Rooney was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Ros-Lehtinen also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did note vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Ros-Lehtinen was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Dennis A. Ross did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Ross also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did note vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Ross was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. John Rutherford voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rutherford also voted (against cutting) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rutherford also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Darren Soto voted to restore funds to community schools. Soto also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Soto also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz voted to restore funds to community schools. Schultz also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schultz also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Daniel Webster voted not to restore funds to community schools. Webster also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Webster also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Frederica S. Wilson voted to restore funds to community schools. Wilson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Wilson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ted Yoho voted not to restore funds to community schools. Yoho also voted (against cutting) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Yoho also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In FL, voter participation dropped 36 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in FL.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 13,583,774 in FL.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 3,474,288 in FL.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,424,887 more people in FL to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
FL General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 9,330,811 1,103,859
Presidential Turnout 9,244,023 1,700,526
Midterm Turnout 5,880,225 708,139
# of Drop-Off Voters

3,363,798 992,387

Gov
Toss Up: Open

Sen
Toss up: Nelson

House
Likely D: 07 - Murphy
Lean D: 27 - OPEN
Republican Toss Up: 26 - Curbelo
Lean R: 18 - Mast
Likely R: 15 - Open / 16 - Buchanan / 25 - Diaz-Balart

 
 

FL

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

76 percent of educators and school staff in GA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 24 percent of GA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 69 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 84 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 31 percent of GA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 24 percent of educators in GA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 16 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 33 percent of educators in GA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In GA, educators reported getting an average of 6 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. GA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in GA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In GA, 40 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Georgia Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,020

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 37
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Georgia Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.55

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 34
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Georgia Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $56,329

Rank of State for 2018: 23
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Georgia State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,186

Rank of State for 2017: 12
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Georgia Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,573

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 33
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,839

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 32

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Georgia Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -12.7%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 32
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Georgia, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Johnny Isakson voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Isakson also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Isakson did not vote on ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. David Perdue voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Perdue also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Perdue also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Rick W. Allen voted not to restore funds to community schools. Allen also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Allen also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sanford D. Bishop Jr. voted to restore funds to community schools. Bishop also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bishop also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Earl L. "Buddy" Carter voted not to restore funds to community schools. Carter also voted (against cutting) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Carter also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Doug Collins voted not to restore funds to community schools. Collins also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Collins also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Drew Ferguson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Ferguson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ferguson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Graves voted not to restore funds to community schools. Graves also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Graves also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Karen Handel voted not to restore funds to community schools. Handel also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy. Handel did not vote on the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Handel supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jody B. Hice voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hice also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hice also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Hank Johnson voted to restore funds to community schools. Johnson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Lewis voted to restore funds to community schools. Lewis also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lewis also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Barry Loudermilk did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Loudermilk also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did note vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Loudermilk was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Tom Price did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Price also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Scott voted to restore funds to community schools. Scott also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Scott also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Austin Scott voted not to restore funds to community schools. Scott also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Scott also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In GA, voter participation dropped 38 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in GA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 6,179,587 in GA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 2,043,334 in GA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 789,766 more people in GA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
GA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,873,603 702,783
Presidential Turnout 4,116,055 882,214
Midterm Turnout 2,567,625 343,995
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,548,430 538,219

Gov
Solid R: Open - R

 
 

House
Lean R: 06 - Handel
Likely R: 07 - Woodall

 
 

GA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Hawaii Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $14,101

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 15
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Hawaii Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.49

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 33
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Hawaii Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $57,866

Rank of State for 2018: 18
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Hawaii State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $18,404

Rank of State for 2017: 2
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Hawaii Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,658

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 16
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,845

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 31

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Hawaii Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 7.9%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 31
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Hawaii, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Mazie K. Hirono voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Hirono also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Hirono also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Brian Schatz voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Schatz also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Schatz also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard voted to restore funds to community schools. Gabbard also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gabbard also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Sen. Brian Schatz voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Schatz also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Schatz also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Colleen Hanabusa voted to restore funds to community schools. Hanabusa also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hanabusa also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In HI, voter participation dropped 21 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 7 AFT members running in HI.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 772,312 in HI.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 67,955 in HI.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 23,966 more people in HI to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
HI General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 587,332 73,036
Presidential Turnout 478,716 45,029
Midterm Turnout 378,716 27,269
# of Drop-Off Voters

100,000 17,760

Gov
Solid D: Ige - D

Sen
Solid D: Hirono - D

 
 

 
 

HI

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Idaho Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $7,341

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 50
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Idaho Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 18.67

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 45
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Idaho Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $49,225

Rank of State for 2018: 41
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Idaho State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,792

Rank of State for 2017: 14
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Idaho Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,250

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 46
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,045

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 30

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Idaho Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -3.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 30
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Idaho, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Michael D. Crapo voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Crapo also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Crapo also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Jim Risch voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Risch also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Risch also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Raúl R. Labrador voted not to restore funds to community schools. Labrador also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Labrador also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Simpson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Simpson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Simpson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In ID, voter participation dropped 36 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in ID.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,002,595 in ID.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 189,905 in ID.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 115,740 more people in ID to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 12-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
ID General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 886,836 205,888
Presidential Turnout 700,133 146,397
Midterm Turnout 450,693 63,922
# of Drop-Off Voters

249,440 82,475

Gov
Solid R: Open - R

 
 

 
 

 
 

ID

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

75 percent of educators and school staff in IL reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 45 percent of IL teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 69 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 86 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 56 percent of IL educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 41 percent of educators in IL said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 13 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 43 percent of educators in IL said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In IL, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. IL teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 41 percent of educators in IL agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In IL, 39 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Illinois Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $14,544

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 14
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Illinois Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.71

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 36
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Illinois Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $65,776

Rank of State for 2018: 11
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Illinois State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017:  

Rank of State for 2017:  
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Illinois Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $13,621

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 5
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,061

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 29

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Illinois Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 9.8%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 29
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Illinois, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Tammy Duckworth voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Duckworth also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Duckworth also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Richard J. Durbin voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Durbin also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Durbin also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Mike Bost voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bost also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bost also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Cheri Bustos voted to restore funds to community schools. Bustos also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bustos also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Danny K. Davis voted to restore funds to community schools. Davis also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Davis also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Rodney Davis voted not to restore funds to community schools. Davis also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Davis also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Foster voted to restore funds to community schools. Foster also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Foster also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Luis V Gutiérrez voted to restore funds to community schools. Gutiérrez also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gutiérrez also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Randy Hultgren voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hultgren also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hultgren also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Robin Kelly voted to restore funds to community schools. Kelly also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kelly also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger voted not to restore funds to community schools. Kinzinger also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kinzinger also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi voted to restore funds to community schools. Krishnamoorthi also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Krishnamoorthi also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Darin LaHood voted not to restore funds to community schools. LaHood also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. LaHood also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Daniel Lipinski voted to restore funds to community schools. Lipinski also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lipinski also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Quigley voted to restore funds to community schools. Quigley also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Quigley also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Peter Roskam voted not to restore funds to community schools. Roskam also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Roskam also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bobby L. Rush voted to restore funds to community schools. Rush also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rush also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jan Schakowsky voted to restore funds to community schools. Schakowsky also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schakowsky also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brad Schneider voted to restore funds to community schools. Schneider also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schneider also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Shimkus voted not to restore funds to community schools. Shimkus also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Shimkus also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In IL, voter participation dropped 36 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in IL.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 7,996,698 in IL.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 2,329,394 in IL.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,072,157 more people in IL to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
IL General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 4,954,997 770,877
Presidential Turnout 5,455,312 1,178,427
Midterm Turnout 3,464,753 442,894
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,990,559 735,533

Gov
Toss Up: Rauner

 
 

House
Republican Toss up: 06 Roskam / 12 - Bost
Lean R: 14 - Hultgren
Likely R: 13 - Davis

 
 

IL

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

76 percent of educators and school staff in IN reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 48 percent of IN teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 88 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 96 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 48 percent of IN educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 28 percent of educators in IN said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 0 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 64 percent of educators in IN said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In IN, educators reported getting an average of 6.4 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. IN teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15.3 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 24 percent of educators in IN agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In IN, 48 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Indiana Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,109

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 35
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Indiana Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 18.15

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 42
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Indiana Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $54,846

Rank of State for 2018: 26
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Indiana State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,616

Rank of State for 2017: 25
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Indiana Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,361

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 27
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,556

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 17

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Indiana Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -12.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 17
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Indiana, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Joe Donnelly voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Donnelly also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Donnelly also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Todd Young voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Young also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Young also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Jim Banks voted not to restore funds to community schools. Banks also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Banks also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Susan W. Brooks voted to restore funds to community schools. Brooks also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brooks also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Larry Bucshon voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bucshon also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bucshon also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. André Carson voted to restore funds to community schools. Carson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Carson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Trey Hollingsworth voted to restore funds to community schools. Hollingsworth also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hollingsworth also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Luke Messer voted not to restore funds to community schools. Messer also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Messer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Todd Rokita voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rokita also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rokita also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Peter J. Visclosky voted to restore funds to community schools. Visclosky also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Visclosky also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jackie Walorski voted not to restore funds to community schools. Walorski also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walorski also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In IN, voter participation dropped 49 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in IN.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,395,801 in IN.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,217,732 in IN.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 571,791 more people in IN to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
IN General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,083,193 580,082
Presidential Turnout 2,724,500 559,627
Midterm Turnout 1,401,000 161,411
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,323,500 398,216

 
 

Sen
Toss up: Donnelly

House
Likely R: 02 - Walorski

 
 

IN

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Iowa Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,436

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 28
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Iowa Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.24

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 22
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Iowa Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $56,790

Rank of State for 2018: 22
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Iowa State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,254

Rank of State for 2017: 38
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Iowa Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,759

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 32
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,083

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 11

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Iowa Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 2.0%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 11
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Iowa, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Joni Ernst voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Ernst also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Ernst also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Charles E. Grassley voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Grassley also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Grassley also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Rod Blum voted to restore funds to community schools. Blum also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Blum also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve King voted not to restore funds to community schools. King also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. King also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dave Loebsack voted to restore funds to community schools. Loebsack also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Loebsack also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Young voted not to restore funds to community schools. Young also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Young also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In IA, voter participation dropped 29 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 2 AFT members running in IA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,046,929 in IA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 631,758 in IA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 182,936 more people in IA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 27-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
IA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,349,908 244,261
Presidential Turnout 1,576,375 364,285
Midterm Turnout 1,116,986 175,559
# of Drop-Off Voters

459,389 188,726

 
 

 
 

House
Republican Toss Up: 01 - Blum
Lean R: 03 - Young

 
 

IA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

84 percent of educators and school staff in KS reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 64 percent of KS teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 93 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 95 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 32 percent of KS educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 32 percent of educators in KS said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 2 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 32 percent of educators in KS said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In KS, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. KS teachers and school staff also reported an average of 18 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 45 percent of educators in KS agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In KS, 43 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Kansas Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,216

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 33
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Kansas Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.39

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 10
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Kansas Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $50,403

Rank of State for 2018: 38
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Kansas State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,730

Rank of State for 2017: 43
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Kansas Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,227

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 29
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,024

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 44

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Kansas Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -8.6%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 44
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Kansas, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. Jerry Moran & Pat Roberts voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Both senators also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. They also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Ron Estes voted not to restore funds to community schools. Estes also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Estes also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lynn Jenkins voted not to restore funds to community schools. Jenkins also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jenkins also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Roger Marshall voted not to restore funds to community schools. Marshall also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Marshall also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Pompeo did not vote in any of these decisions.

Rep. Kevin Yoder voted not to restore funds to community schools. Yoder also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Yoder also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In KS, voter participation dropped 30 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in KS.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,749,424 in KS.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 482,459 in KS.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 184,152 more people in KS to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
KS General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,206,211 234,857
Presidential Turnout 1,201,970 237,191
Midterm Turnout 845,379 111,526
# of Drop-Off Voters

356,591 125,665

Gov
Likely R: Colyer - R

 
 

House
Lean R: 02 - Open / 03 - Yoder

 
 

KS

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Kentucky Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,116

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 34
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Kentucky Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 16.39

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 38
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Kentucky Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $52,952

Rank of State for 2018: 30
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Kentucky State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,448

Rank of State for 2017: 26
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Kentucky Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,302

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 20
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,090

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 10

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Kentucky Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -1.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 10
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Kentucky, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Mitch McConnell voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. McConnell also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. McConnell also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Rand Paul voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Paul also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Paul also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Reps. Andy Barr & Harold Rogers voted to restore funds to community schools. Both representatives also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Reps. James R. Comer & Brett Guthrie voted not to restore funds to community schools. Both representatives also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Both also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Thomas Massie voted not to restore funds to community schools. Massie also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Massie also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Yarmuth voted to restore funds to community schools. Yarmuth also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Yarmuth also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In KY, voter participation dropped 26 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in KY.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,900,027 in KY.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 910,801 in KY.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 306,069 more people in KY to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
KY General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,606,017 291,774
Presidential Turnout 1,964,222 437,756
Midterm Turnout 1,457,637 230,388
# of Drop-Off Voters

506,585 207,368

 
 

 
 

House
Lean R: 06 - Barr

 
 

KY

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

72 percent of educators and school staff in LA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 33 percent of LA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 53 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 70 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 28 percent of LA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 35 percent of educators in LA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 5 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 30 percent of educators in LA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In LA, educators reported getting an average of 6.6 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. LA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 40 percent of educators in LA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In LA, 51 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Louisiana Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,322

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 29
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Louisiana Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.29

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 5
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Louisiana Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $50,256

Rank of State for 2018: 39
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Louisiana State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,788

Rank of State for 2017: 33
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Louisiana Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,302

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 28
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,136

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 28

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Louisiana Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -6.7%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 28
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Louisiana, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. Bill Cassidy & John Kennedy voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Cassidy also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Cassidy also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Ralph Abraham, Garret Graves & Clay Higgins voted not to restore funds to community schools. The representatives also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Johnson voted to restore funds to community schools. Johnson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Cedric L. Richmond voted to restore funds to community schools. Richmond also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Richmond also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Scalise did not vote in the decisions to restore funds to community schools, restore funds for professional development and class-size reduction. Scalise was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In LA, voter participation dropped 21 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 4 AFT members running in LA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,957,033 in LA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 837,561 in LA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 376,773 more people in LA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 7-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
LA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,036,579 391,057
Presidential Turnout 2,016,578 468,794
Midterm Turnout 1,602,860 290,136
# of Drop-Off Voters

413,718 178,658

Gov
Likely R: Reynolds - R

 
 

 
 

 
 

LA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Maine Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $13,619

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 17
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Maine Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.22

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 3
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Maine Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $51,663

Rank of State for 2018: 33
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Maine State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,770

Rank of State for 2017: 16
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Maine Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,965

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 21
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,582

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 37

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Maine Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -1.0%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 37
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Maine, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Susan Collins voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Collins also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Collins also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Angus King voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. King also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. King also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Chellie Pingree voted to restore funds to community schools. Pingree also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pingree also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bruce Poliquin voted to restore funds to community schools. Poliquin also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Poliquin also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In ME, voter participation dropped 21 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 16 AFT members running in ME.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 964,010 in ME.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 228,238 in ME.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 88,153 more people in ME to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
ME General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 610,348 86,678
Presidential Turnout 761,413 149,577
Midterm Turnout 604,544 84,870
# of Drop-Off Voters

156,869 64,707

Gov
Toss Up: Open

Sen
Solid D: King - D

House
Lean R: 02 - Poliquin

School Board
Osseo, Minnespolis, St. Paul

ME

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

74 percent of educators and school staff in MD reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 63 percent of MD teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 71 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 78 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 23 percent of MD educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 27 percent of educators in MD said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 17 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 51 percent of educators in MD said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MD, educators reported getting an average of 6.3 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MD teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 40 percent of educators in MD agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MD, 47 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Maryland Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $14,571

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 13
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Maryland Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.8

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 23
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Maryland Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $69,761

Rank of State for 2018: 7
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Maryland State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,372

Rank of State for 2017: 19
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Maryland Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,575

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 25
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,536

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 18

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Maryland Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 5.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 18
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Maryland, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Cardin also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Cardin also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Chris Van Hollen voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Van Hollen also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Van Hollen also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Anthony G. Brown voted to restore funds to community schools. Brown also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brown also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Elijah E. Cummings voted to restore funds to community schools. Cummings also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cummings also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Delaney voted to restore funds to community schools. Delaney also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Delaney also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Andy Harris voted not to restore funds to community schools. Harris also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Harris also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steny H. Hoyer voted to restore funds to community schools. Hoyer also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hoyer also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jamie Raskin voted to restore funds to community schools. Raskin also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Raskin also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger voted to restore funds to community schools. Ruppersberger also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ruppersberger also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Sarbanes voted to restore funds to community schools. Sarbanes also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sarbanes also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MD, voter participation dropped 38 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 6 AFT members running in MD.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 3,711,566 in MD.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,174,640 in MD.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 545,116 more people in MD to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MD General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,093,384 311,020
Presidential Turnout 2,775,080 610,829
Midterm Turnout 1,707,659 248,077
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,067,421 362,752

Gov
Likely R: Hogan - R

Sen
Solid D: Cardin - D

 
 

Ballot
Minimum Wage and Paid

MD

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

77 percent of educators and school staff in MA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 42 percent of MA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 48 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 89 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 52 percent of MA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 36 percent of educators in MA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 8 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 49 percent of educators in MA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MA, educators reported getting an average of 6.3 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 14 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 60 percent of educators in MA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MA, 32 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Massachusetts Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $15,994

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 8
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Massachusetts Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.39

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 13
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Massachusetts Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $79,710

Rank of State for 2018: 3
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Massachusetts State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,212

Rank of State for 2017: 11
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Massachusetts Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,732

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 8
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,076

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 4

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Massachusetts Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -1.6%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 4
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Massachusetts, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Edward J. Markey voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Markey also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Markey also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Warren also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Warren also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Michael E. Capuano voted to restore funds to community schools. Capuano also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Capuano also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Katherine M. Clark voted to restore funds to community schools. Clark also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Clark also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. William Keating voted to restore funds to community schools. Keating also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Keating also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III voted to restore funds to community schools. Kennedy  also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, X the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kennedy  also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Stephen F. Lynch voted to restore funds to community schools. Lynch also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lynch also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim McGovern voted to restore funds to community schools. McGovern also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McGovern also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Seth Moulton voted to restore funds to community schools. Moulton also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Moulton also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Richard E. Neal voted to restore funds to community schools. Neal also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Neal also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Niki Tsongas voted to restore funds to community schools. Tsongas also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Tsongas also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

 

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MA, voter participation dropped 36 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 6 AFT members running in MA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,137,373 in MA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,219,601 in MA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 559,359 more people in MA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 17-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,590,523 519,954
Presidential Turnout 3,272,091 747,051
Midterm Turnout 2,098,780 275,800
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,173,311 471,251

Gov
Likely R: Baker - R

Sen
Solid D: Warren - D

 
 

Ballot
Millionaire's tax

MA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

89 percent of educators and school staff in MI reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 54 percent of MI teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 90 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 99 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 43 percent of MI educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 39 percent of educators in MI said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 47 percent of educators in MI said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MI, educators reported getting an average of 6.3 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MI teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 31 percent of educators in MI agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MI, 45 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Michigan Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,968

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 21
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Michigan Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 18.25

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 43
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Michigan Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $62,702

Rank of State for 2018: 13
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Michigan State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,033

Rank of State for 2017: 45
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Michigan Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,935

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 6
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,757

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 33

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Michigan Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -15.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 33
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Michigan, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Gary Peters voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Peters also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Peters also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Stabenow also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Stabenow also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Justin Amash voted not to restore funds to community schools. Amash also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Amash also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jack Bergman voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bergman also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bergman also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Bishop voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bishop also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bishop also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Conyers Jr. voted to restore funds to community schools. Conyers also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, X the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Conyers also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Debbie Dingell voted to restore funds to community schools. Dingell also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Dingell also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Huizenga voted not to restore funds to community schools. Huizenga also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Huizenga also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dan Kildee voted to restore funds to community schools. Kildee also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kildee also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brenda Lawrence voted to restore funds to community schools. Lawrence also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lawrence also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sander M. Levin voted to restore funds to community schools. Levin also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Levin also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Paul Mitchell voted not to restore funds to community schools. Mitchell also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mitchell also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Moolenaar voted not to restore funds to community schools. Moolenaar also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Moolenaar also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dave Trott voted not to restore funds to community schools. Trott also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Trott also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Fred Upton voted to restore funds to community schools. Upton also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Upton also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tim Walberg voted not to restore funds to community schools. Walberg also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walberg also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MI, voter participation dropped 34 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in MI.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 7,668,594 in MI.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,844,515 in MI.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 515,519 more people in MI to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MI General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 5,641,126 1,505,351
Presidential Turnout 4,888,360 1,078,884
Midterm Turnout 3,208,621 421,881
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,679,739 657,003

Gov
Toss Up - Open

Sen
Likely D: Stabenow - D

House
Republican Toss Up: 11-OPEN
Lean R: MI-08
Likely R: 01 - Bergman / 06 - Upton/ 07 - Walberg

 
 

MI

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

76 percent of educators and school staff in MN reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 35 percent of MN teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 63 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 91 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 64 percent of MN educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 49 percent of educators in MN said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 39 percent of educators in MN said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MN, educators reported getting an average of 6.7 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MN teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 43 percent of educators in MN agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MN, 38 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Minnesota Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $12,700

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 18
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Minnesota Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.44

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 31
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Minnesota Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $57,782

Rank of State for 2018: 21
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Minnesota State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,914

Rank of State for 2017: 20
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Minnesota Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $11,302

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 13
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,435

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 5

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Minnesota Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 6.0%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 5
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Minnesota, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Al Franken voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Franken also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Franken also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Klobuchar also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Klobuchar also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Tina Smith did not vote on the decision to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Smith also did not cast votes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, the tax plan, Betsy DeVos’ nomination, and ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Keith Ellison voted to restore funds to community schools. Ellison also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ellison also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Emmer voted not to restore funds to community schools. Emmer also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Emmer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jason Lewis voted not to restore funds to community schools. Lewis also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lewis also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Betty McCollum voted to restore funds to community schools. McCollum also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McCollum also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Rick Nolan voted to restore funds to community schools. Nolan also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Nolan also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Erik Paulsen voted not to restore funds to community schools. Paulsen also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Paulsen also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Collin C. Peterson voted to restore funds to community schools. Peterson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Peterson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tim Walz voted to restore funds to community schools. Walz also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walz also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

 

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MN, voter participation dropped 33 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 3 AFT members running in MN.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 3,237,218 in MN.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 793,717 in MN.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 374,748 more people in MN to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MN General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,202,706 483,244
Presidential Turnout 2,818,811 689,908
Midterm Turnout 1,890,769 299,703
# of Drop-Off Voters

928,042 390,205

Gov
Toss Up - Open

Sen
Solid D: Klobuchar
Lean D: Smith

House
Likely D: 07 - Peterson
D Toss Up: 01 - Open / 08 - OPEN
Republcan Toss Up: 02 - Lewis / c03 Paulsen

Ballot
Redistricing and Criminal

MN

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

65 percent of educators and school staff in MS reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 29 percent of MS teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 53 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 71 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 41 percent of MS educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 41 percent of educators in MS said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 6 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 53 percent of educators in MS said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MS, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MS teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 24 percent of educators in MS agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MS, 59 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Mississippi Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $8,926

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 47
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Mississippi Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.14

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 27
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Mississippi Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $43,107

Rank of State for 2018: 51
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Mississippi State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,857

Rank of State for 2017: 21
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Mississippi Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,988

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 40
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,118

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 43

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Mississippi Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 9.9%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 43
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Mississippi, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Thad Cochran voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Cochran also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Cochran also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith did not vote in any of these decisions.

Sen. Roger Wicker voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Wicker also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Wicker also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Gregg Harper voted not to restore funds to community schools. He also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. He also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Trent Kelly voted not to restore funds to community schools. Kelly also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kelly also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steven M. Palazzo voted not to restore funds to community schools. Palazzo also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Palazzo also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bennie Thompson voted to restore funds to community schools. Thompson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, X the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Thompson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MS, voter participation dropped 45 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in MS.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,345,441 in MS.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 228,286 in MS.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 332,474 more people in MS to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 8-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MS General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,981,703 135,913
Presidential Turnout 1,185,211 136,192
Midterm Turnout 654,218 50,019
# of Drop-Off Voters

530,993 86,173

 
 

Sen
Likely R: Open
Solid R: Wicker - R

 
 

 
 

MS

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

82 percent of educators and school staff in MO reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 45 percent of MO teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 71 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 92 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 47 percent of MO educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 42 percent of educators in MO said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 42 percent of educators in MO said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MO, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MO teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 45 percent of educators in MO agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MO, 63 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Missouri Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,578

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 31
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Missouri Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.59

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 15
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Missouri Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $49,208

Rank of State for 2018: 42
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Missouri State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,129

Rank of State for 2017: 44
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Missouri Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,875

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 31
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,450

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 38

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Missouri Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -4.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 38
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Missouri, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Roy Blunt voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Blunt also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Blunt also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Claire McCaskill voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. McCaskill also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. McCaskill also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. William Lacy Clay voted to restore funds to community schools. Clay also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Clay also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II voted to restore funds to community schools. Cleaver also voted (to cut) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cleaver also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sam Graves voted (not to) restore funds to community schools. Graves did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction. Graves was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Graves also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Vicky Hartzler voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hartzler also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hartzler also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Billy Long voted not to restore funds to community schools. Long also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Long also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer voted to restore funds to community schools. Luetkemeyer also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Luetkemeyer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jason Smith voted not to restore funds to community schools. Smith also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Smith also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ann Wagner voted not to restore funds to community schools. Wagner also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Wagner also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MO, voter participation dropped 45 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 27 AFT members running in MO.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 3,813,384 in MO.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,159,591 in MO.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 531,392 more people in MO to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 10-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MO General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,391,342 442,810
Presidential Turnout 2,825,841 607,234
Midterm Turnout 1,565,631 204,626
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,260,210 402,608

 
 

Sen
Toss up: Mc Caskill

House
Likely R: 02 - Wagner

 
 

MO

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

48 percent of educators and school staff in MT reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 32 percent of MT teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 48 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 76 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 80 percent of MT educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 60 percent of educators in MT said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 8 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 16 percent of educators in MT said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In MT, educators reported getting an average of 6.9 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. MT teachers and school staff also reported an average of 8 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 24 percent of educators in MT agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In MT, 8 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Montana Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,640

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 26
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Montana Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.96

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 18
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Montana Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $52,776

Rank of State for 2018: 31
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Montana State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,742

Rank of State for 2017: 34
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Montana Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,907

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 48
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,603

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 36

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Montana Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -1.5%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 36
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Montana, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Steve Daines voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Daines also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Daines also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Jon Tester voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Tester also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Tester also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Greg Gianforte voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gianforte also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and did not vote in the decsion to repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gianforte also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ryan Zinke did not vote in any of these decisions.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In MT, voter participation dropped 28 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in MT.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 748,619 in MT.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 165,933 in MT.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 53,585 more people in MT to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
MT General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 580,127 106,896
Presidential Turnout 494,211 95,375
Midterm Turnout 358,202 46,172
# of Drop-Off Voters

136,009 49,203

 
 

Sen
Likely D: Tester - D

House
Likely R: AL Gianforte

 
 

MT

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Nebraska Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $12,615

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 19
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Nebraska Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.56

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 14
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Nebraska Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $53,473

Rank of State for 2018: 28
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Nebraska State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,911

Rank of State for 2017: 8
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Nebraska Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,269

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 37
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,122

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 42

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Nebraska Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -2.2%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 42
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Nebraska, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Deb Fischer voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Fischer also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Fischer also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Ben Sasse voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Sasse also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Sasse also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Don Bacon voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bacon also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bacon also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jeff Fortenberry voted not to restore funds to community schools. Fortenberry also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Fortenberry also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Adrian Smith voted not to restore funds to community schools. Smith also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Smith also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NE, voter participation dropped 36 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 14 AFT members running in NE.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,119,408 in NE.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 341,749 in NE.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 200,494 more people in NE to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 19-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NE General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 703,032 132,088
Presidential Turnout 851,539 187,360
Midterm Turnout 542,684 71,618
# of Drop-Off Voters

308,855 115,742

Gov
Solid - R: Ricketts - R

Sen
Likely R: Fischer

House
Lean R: 02 - Bacon

 
 

NE

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

76 percent of educators and school staff in NV reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 76 percent of NV teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 84 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 89 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 39 percent of NV educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 32 percent of educators in NV said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 32 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 45 percent of educators in NV said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In NV, educators reported getting an average of 6.4 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. NV teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 34 percent of educators in NV agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In NV, 39 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Nevada Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,190

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 43
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Nevada Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 20.59

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 48
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Nevada Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $57,812

Rank of State for 2018: 20
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Nevada State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $8,404

Rank of State for 2017: 18
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Nevada Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,274

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 45
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,213

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 40

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Nevada Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -0.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 40
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Nevada, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Masto also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Masto also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Dean Heller voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Heller also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Heller also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Mark Amodei voted not to restore funds to community schools. Amodei also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Amodei also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ruben Kihuen voted to restore funds to community schools. Kihuen also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kihuen also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jacky Rosen voted to restore funds to community schools. Rosen also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rosen also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dina Titus voted to restore funds to community schools. Titus also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Titus also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NV, voter participation dropped 48 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 3 AFT members running in NV.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,909,551 in NV.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 481,075 in NV.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 309,470 more people in NV to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 7-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NV General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,578,741 246,206
Presidential Turnout 1,124,630 221,938
Midterm Turnout 579,894 62,355
# of Drop-Off Voters

544,736 159,583

Gov
Toss up: Open

Sen
Toss up: Heller

House
Likely D: 04 OPEN
Lean D: 03 - OPEN

 
 

NV

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

New Hampshire Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $15,734

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 11
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

New Hampshire Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.35

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 7
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

New Hampshire Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $57,833

Rank of State for 2018: 19
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

New Hampshire State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $3,338

Rank of State for 2017: 49
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

New Hampshire Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $16,073

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 1
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,845

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 2

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

New Hampshire Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 3.3%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 2
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In New Hampshire, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Maggie Hassan voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Hassan also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Hassan also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Shaheen also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Shaheen also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Ann McLane Kuster voted to restore funds to community schools. Kuster also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kuster also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Carol Shea-Porter voted to restore funds to community schools. Shea-Porter also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Shea-Porter also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NH, voter participation dropped 34 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 38 AFT members running in NH.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 989,029 in NH.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 116,475 in NH.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 123,115 more people in NH to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 6-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NH General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 713,436 85,125
Presidential Turnout 731,107 86,885
Midterm Turnout 483,193 42,071
# of Drop-Off Voters

247,914 44,814

Gov
Lean R: Sununu

 
 

House
Likely D: 02 - Kuster
Lean D: 01 - OPEN

 
 

NH

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

74 percent of educators and school staff in NJ reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 64 percent of NJ teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 85 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 95 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 39 percent of NJ educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 32 percent of educators in NJ said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 5 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 51 percent of educators in NJ said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In NJ, educators reported getting an average of 6.2 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. NJ teachers and school staff also reported an average of 17 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 35 percent of educators in NJ agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In NJ, 32 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

New Jersey Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $18,875

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 4
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

New Jersey Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.25

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 4
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

New Jersey Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $69,917

Rank of State for 2018: 6
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

New Jersey State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,444

Rank of State for 2017: 27
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

New Jersey Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $13,868

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 4
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,870

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 13

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

New Jersey Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -3.5%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 13
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In New Jersey, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Cory Booker voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Booker also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Booker also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Robert Menendez voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Menendez also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Menendez also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen voted not to restore funds to community schools. Frelinghuysen also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Frelinghuysen also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Josh Gottheimer voted to restore funds to community schools. Gottheimer also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gottheimer also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Leonard Lance voted to restore funds to community schools. Lance also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lance also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Frank A. LoBiondo voted to restore funds to community schools. LoBiondo also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. LoBiondo also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom MacArthur voted not to restore funds to community schools. MacArthur also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. MacArthur also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Donald Norcross voted to restore funds to community schools. Norcross also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Norcross also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. voted to restore funds to community schools. Pallone also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pallone also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr. voted to restore funds to community schools. Pascrell also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pascrell also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Donald M. Payne Jr. voted to restore funds to community schools. Payne also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Payne also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Albio Sires voted to restore funds to community schools. Sires also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sires also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Christopher H. Smith voted to restore funds to community schools. Smith also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Smith also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman voted to restore funds to community schools. Coleman also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Coleman also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NJ, voter participation dropped 50 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are AFT members running in NJ.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 6,322,333 in NJ.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,516,576 in NJ.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 794,728 more people in NJ to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NJ General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 4,947,220 423,739
Presidential Turnout 3,899,160 750,776
Midterm Turnout 1,956,181 200,915
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,942,979 549,861

 
 

Sen
Likely D: Menendez - D

House
Likley D: 05 Gottheimer
Lean D: 02 - OPEN
Republican Toss Up: 07 - Lance/11-OPEN
Lean R: 03 - MacArthur

 
 

NJ

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

91 percent of educators and school staff in NM reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 42 percent of NM teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 86 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 95 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 49 percent of NM educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 41 percent of educators in NM said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 25 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 55 percent of educators in NM said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In NM, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. NM teachers and school staff also reported an average of 18 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 37 percent of educators in NM agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In NM, 47 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

New Mexico Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,942

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 38
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

New Mexico Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.45

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 32
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

New Mexico Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $47,839

Rank of State for 2018: 45
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

New Mexico State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,683

Rank of State for 2017: 9
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

New Mexico Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,921

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 47
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $1,755

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 48

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

New Mexico Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 9.6%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 48
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In New Mexico, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Martin Heinrich voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Heinrich also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Heinrich also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Tom Udall voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Udall also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Udall also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham voted to restore funds to community schools. Grisham also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Grisham also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ben Ray Luján voted to restore funds to community schools. Luján also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Luján also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Pearce voted not to restore funds to community schools. Pearce also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pearce also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NM, voter participation dropped 34 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 25 AFT members running in NM.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,303,017 in NM.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 316,843 in NM.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 93,167 more people in NM to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NM General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 980,859 156,112
Presidential Turnout 787,225 142,109
Midterm Turnout 520,347 58,042
# of Drop-Off Voters

266,878 84,067

Gov
Lean D: Open

Sen
Solid D: Heinrich - D

House
Lean R: 02 - Open

 
 

NM

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

71 percent of educators and school staff in NY reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 27 percent of NY teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 59 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 85 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 56 percent of NY educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 46 percent of educators in NY said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 11 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 33 percent of educators in NY said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In NY, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. NY teachers and school staff also reported an average of 14 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 58 percent of educators in NY agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In NY, 32 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

New York Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $22,941

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 1
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

New York Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.16

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 11
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

New York Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $83,585

Rank of State for 2018: 1
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

New York State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $10,050

Rank of State for 2017: 7
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

New York Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,940

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 41
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,332

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 6

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

New York Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -4.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 6
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In New York, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Gillibrand also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Gillibrand also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Charles E. Schumer voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Schumer also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Schumer also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Yvette D. Clarke voted to restore funds to community schools. Clarke also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Clarke also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Chris Collins voted not to restore funds to community schools. Collins also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Collins also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Joseph Crowley voted to restore funds to community schools. Crowley also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Crowley also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dan Donovan voted to restore funds to community schools. Donovan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Donovan also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Eliot L. Engel voted to restore funds to community schools. Engel also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Engel also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Adriano Espaillat voted to restore funds to community schools. Espaillat also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Espaillat also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John J. Faso voted to restore funds to community schools. Faso also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Faso also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brian Higgins voted to restore funds to community schools. Higgins also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Higgins also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Hakeem Jeffries voted to restore funds to community schools. Jeffries also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jeffries also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Katko voted to restore funds to community schools. Katko also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Katko also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Peter T. King voted to restore funds to community schools. King also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. King also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Nita M. Lowey voted to restore funds to community schools. Lowey also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lowey also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney voted to restore funds to community schools. Maloney also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Maloney also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney voted to restore funds to community schools. Maloney also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Maloney also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Gregory W. Meeks voted to restore funds to community schools. Meeks also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Meeks also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Grace Meng voted to restore funds to community schools. Meng also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Meng also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler voted to restore funds to community schools. Nadler also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Nadler also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Reed voted not to restore funds to community schools. Reed also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Reed also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kathleen Rice voted to restore funds to community schools. Rice also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rice also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. José E. Serrano voted to restore funds to community schools. Serrano also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Serrano also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Louise M. Slaughter voted to restore funds to community schools. Slaughter also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Slaughter also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Elise Stefanik voted to restore funds to community schools. Stefanik also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Stefanik also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Suozzi voted to restore funds to community schools. Suozzi also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Suozzi also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Claudia Tenney voted to restore funds to community schools. Tenney also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Tenney also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Paul Tonko voted to restore funds to community schools. Tonko also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Tonko also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Nydia M. Velázquez voted to restore funds to community schools. Velázquez also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Velázquez also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lee Zeldin voted to restore funds to community schools. Zeldin also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Zeldin also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NY, voter participation dropped 50 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in NY.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 11,698,755 in NY.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 3,010,508 in NY.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,674,719 more people in NY to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 12-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NY General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 7,148,675 934,328
Presidential Turnout 6,969,360 1,501,816
Midterm Turnout 3,482,132 389,270
# of Drop-Off Voters

3,487,228 1,112,546

Gov
Solid D: Cuomo - D

Sen
Solid D: Gillibrand - D

House
Republican Toss Up: 19 - Faso
Toss Up: 22 - Tenney
Lean R: 11 - Donovan
Likely R: 01 - Zeldin / 24 - Katko

 
 

NY

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

80 percent of educators and school staff in NC reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 38 percent of NC teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 76 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 81 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 41 percent of NC educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 20 percent of educators in NC said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 15 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 48 percent of educators in NC said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In NC, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. NC teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 49 percent of educators in NC agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In NC, 53 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

North Carolina Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,018

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 46
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

North Carolina Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.55

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 34
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

North Carolina Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $50,861

Rank of State for 2018: 37
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

North Carolina State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,571

Rank of State for 2017: 10
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

North Carolina Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,385

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 44
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $2,437

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 47

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

North Carolina Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -7.5%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 47
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In North Carolina, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Richard M. Burr voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Burr also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Burr also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Thom Tillis voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Tillis also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Tillis also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Alma Adams voted to restore funds to community schools. Adams also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Adams also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ted Budd voted not to restore funds to community schools. Budd also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Budd also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. G. K. Butterfield voted to restore funds to community schools. Butterfield also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Butterfield also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Virginia Foxx voted not to restore funds to community schools. Foxx also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Foxx also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. George Holding voted not to restore funds to community schools. Holding also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Holding also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Richard Hudson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hudson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hudson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Walter B. Jones voted to restore funds to community schools. Jones also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jones also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Patrick T. McHenry voted not to restore funds to community schools. McHenry also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McHenry also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark Meadows voted to restore funds to community schools. Meadows also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Meadows also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Robert Pittenger voted not to restore funds to community schools. Pittenger also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pittenger also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David E. Price voted to restore funds to community schools. Price also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Price also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Rouzer voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rouzer also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rouzer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark Walker voted not to restore funds to community schools. Walker also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walker also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In NC, voter participation dropped 38 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 5 AFT members running in NC.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 6,596,095 in NC.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,962,337 in NC.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,135,323 more people in NC to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 12-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
NC General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 4,318,222 822,855
Presidential Turnout 4,776,283 1,055,001
Midterm Turnout 2,969,927 401,253
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,806,356 653,748

 
 

 
 

House
Lean R: 09 - Open / 13 - Budd
Likley R: 02 - Holding / 08 - Hudson

 
 

NC

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

North Dakota Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $13,717

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 16
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

North Dakota Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 11.82

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 2
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

North Dakota Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $54,421

Rank of State for 2018: 27
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

North Dakota State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $11,780

Rank of State for 2017: 5
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

North Dakota Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,197

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 38
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,589

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 15

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

North Dakota Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 32.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 15
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

yes on the

In North Dakota, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Heitkamp also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Heitkamp also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. John Hoeven voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Hoeven also voted yes the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Hoeven also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Kevin Cramer voted not to restore funds to community schools. Cramer also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cramer also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In ND, voter participation dropped 24 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 5 AFT members running in ND.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 500,986 in ND.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 43,780 in ND.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 42,970 more people in ND to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: n/a
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
ND General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 468,375 73,910
Presidential Turnout 332,775 50,690
Midterm Turnout 251,724 35,314
# of Drop-Off Voters

81,051 15,376

 
 

Sen
Toss Up: Heitkamp

 
 

 
 

ND

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

78 percent of educators and school staff in OH reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 48 percent of OH teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 81 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 90 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 45 percent of OH educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 38 percent of educators in OH said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 15 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 37 percent of educators in OH said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In OH, educators reported getting an average of 6.4 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. OH teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 45 percent of educators in OH agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In OH, 44 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Ohio Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $12,413

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 20
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Ohio Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 16.87

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 39
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Ohio Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $58,000

Rank of State for 2018: 17
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Ohio State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,793

Rank of State for 2017: 41
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Ohio Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,505

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 18
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,387

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 22

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Ohio Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -10.6%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 22
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Ohio, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Sherrod Brown voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Brown also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Brown also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Rob Portman voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Portman also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Portman also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Joyce Beatty voted to restore funds to community schools. Beatty also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Beatty also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Chabot voted not to restore funds to community schools. Chabot also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Chabot also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Warren Davidson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Davidson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Davidson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Marcia L. Fudge voted to restore funds to community schools. Fudge also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Fudge also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bob Gibbs voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gibbs also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gibbs also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Johnson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Johnson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Jordan voted not to restore funds to community schools. Jordan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jordan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Joyce voted not to restore funds to community schools. Joyce also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Joyce also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur voted to restore funds to community schools. Kaptur also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kaptur also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bob Latta voted not to restore funds to community schools. Latta also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Latta also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. James B. Renacci voted not to restore funds to community schools. Renacci also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Renacci also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tim Ryan voted to restore funds to community schools. Ryan also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ryan also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Stivers voted to restore funds to community schools. Stivers also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Stivers also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Pat Tiberi voted X restore funds to community schools. Tiberi also voted (against cutting) funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Tiberi also X changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Michael R. Turner voted not to restore funds to community schools. Turner also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Turner also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brad Wenstrup voted not to restore funds to community schools. Wenstrup also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Wenstrup also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In OH, voter participation dropped 44 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 4 AFT members running in OH.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 7,894,090 in OH.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 2,261,617 in OH.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 880,533 more people in OH to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
OH General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 5,460,080 1,002,843
Presidential Turnout 5,552,882 1,177,635
Midterm Turnout 3,137,297 352,165
# of Drop-Off Voters

2,415,585 825,470

Gov
Lean R: Open

Sen
Lean D: Brown - D

House
Republican Toss Up: 12 - Vacant
Lean R: 01 - Chabot
Likely R: 10 - Tuner / 14 - Joyce / 15 - Strivers

 
 

OH

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

83 percent of educators and school staff in OK reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 25 percent of OK teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 92 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 88 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 63 percent of OK educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 54 percent of educators in OK said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 4 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 58 percent of educators in OK said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In OK, educators reported getting an average of 6.1 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. OK teachers and school staff also reported an average of 12 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 29 percent of educators in OK agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In OK, 38 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Oklahoma Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $8,305

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 48
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Oklahoma Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 16.32

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 37
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Oklahoma Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $45,678

Rank of State for 2018: 49
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Oklahoma State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,486

Rank of State for 2017: 37
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Oklahoma Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,460

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 35
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,173

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 27

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Oklahoma Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -2.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 27
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Oklahoma, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. James Lankford & James M. Inhofe voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Both senators also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. They also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Jim Bridenstine was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bridenstine did not vote in the other decisions examined.

Rep. Tom Cole voted not to restore funds to community schools. Cole also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cole also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Frank D. Lucas voted not to restore funds to community schools. Lucas also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Lucas also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Markwayne Mullin voted not to restore funds to community schools. Mullin also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mullin also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Russell voted not to restore funds to community schools. Russell also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Russell also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In OK, voter participation dropped 43 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 5 AFT members running in OK.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,302,611 in OK.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 524,500 in OK.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 272,760 more people in OK to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 12-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
OK General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,870,765 350,831
Presidential Turnout 1,456,710 295,174
Midterm Turnout 833,746 96,328
# of Drop-Off Voters

622,964 198,846

Gov
Solid R: Open

 
 

 
 

 
 

OK

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

81 percent of educators and school staff in OR reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 44 percent of OR teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 60 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 84 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 42 percent of OR educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 23 percent of educators in OR said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 5 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 37 percent of educators in OR said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In OR, educators reported getting an average of 6.7 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. OR teachers and school staff also reported an average of 17 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 28 percent of educators in OR agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In OR, 42 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Oregon Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,121

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 30
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Oregon Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 19.82

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 47
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Oregon Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $63,143

Rank of State for 2018: 12
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Oregon State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,774

Rank of State for 2017: 42
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Oregon Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $10,357

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 19
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,041

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 12

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Oregon Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 14.5%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 12
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Oregon, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. Ron Wyden & Jeff Merkley voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Both senators also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. They also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Earl Blumenauer voted to restore funds to community schools. Blumenauer also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Blumenauer also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Suzanne Bonamici voted to restore funds to community schools. Bonamici also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bonamici also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Peter A. DeFazio voted to restore funds to community schools. DeFazio also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DeFazio also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kurt Schrader voted to restore funds to community schools. Schrader also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Schrader also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Greg Walden voted not to restore funds to community schools. Walden also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Walden also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In OR, voter participation dropped 26 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 11 AFT members running in OR.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 2,647,938 in OR.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 919,535 in OR.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 186,835 more people in OR to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
OR General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,379,133 208,169
Presidential Turnout 1,976,063 419,534
Midterm Turnout 1,471,507 243,011
# of Drop-Off Voters

504,556 176,523

Gov
Likely D: Brown - D

 
 

 
 

 
 

OR

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

75 percent of educators and school staff in PA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 67 percent of PA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 74 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 91 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 43 percent of PA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 34 percent of educators in PA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 8 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 50 percent of educators in PA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In PA, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. PA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 33 percent of educators in PA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In PA, 47 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Pennsylvania Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $15,814

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 10
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Pennsylvania Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.21

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 20
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Pennsylvania Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $67,398

Rank of State for 2018: 9
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Pennsylvania State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $4,341

Rank of State for 2017: 47
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Pennsylvania Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $14,437

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 3
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,327

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 7

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Pennsylvania Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -3.9%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 7
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Pennsylvania, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Patrick J. Toomey voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Toomey also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Toomey also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Bob Casey voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Casey also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Casey also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Lou Barletta voted to restore funds to community schools. Barletta also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Barletta also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brendan F. Boyle voted to restore funds to community schools. Boyle also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Boyle also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Robert A. Brady voted to restore funds to community schools. Brady also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brady also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Matt Cartwright voted to restore funds to community schools. Cartwright also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cartwright also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ryan A. Costello voted to restore funds to community schools. Costello also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Costello also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Charlie Dent voted to restore funds to community schools. Dent also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Dent also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Doyle voted to restore funds to community schools. Doyle also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Doyle also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dwight Evans voted to restore funds to community schools. Evans also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Evans also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick voted to restore funds to community schools. Fitzpatrick also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Fitzpatrick also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Kelly voted not to restore funds to community schools. Kelly also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kelly also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Conor Lamb did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Lamb also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Marino voted to restore funds to community schools. Marino also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Marino also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Patrick Meehan voted not to restore funds to community schools. Meehan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Meehan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tim Murphy voted not to restore funds to community schools. Murphy also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Murphy also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Murphy did not vote on the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy

Rep. Scott Perry voted not to restore funds to community schools. Perry also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Perry also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Keith Rothfus voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rothfus also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rothfus also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Shuster voted not to restore funds to community schools. Shuster also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Shuster also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lloyd K. Smucker voted not to restore funds to community schools. Smucker also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Smucker also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Glenn Thompson voted to restore funds to community schools. Thompson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Thompson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In PA, voter participation dropped 43 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in PA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 8,422,629 in PA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 2,215,622 in PA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,182,628 more people in PA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 6-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
PA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 5,866,515 845,142
Presidential Turnout 6,133,413 1,337,294
Midterm Turnout 3,484,811 414,900
# of Drop-Off Voters

2,648,602 922,394

Gov
Lean D: Wolf - D

Sen
Likely D: Casey - D

House
Likely D: 05 Vacant / 06 OPEN / 08 Cartwright
Lean D: PA07 Vacant
Republican Toss Up: 01 - Fitzpatrick / 17 - Rothfus
Likely R: 10 - Perry / 14 - Open / 16 - Kelly

 
 

PA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

79 percent of educators and school staff in RI reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 46 percent of RI teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 54 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 88 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 31 percent of RI educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 25 percent of educators in RI said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 4 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 52 percent of educators in RI said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In RI, educators reported getting an average of 6.6 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. RI teachers and school staff also reported an average of 18 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 38 percent of educators in RI agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In RI, 48 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Rhode Island Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $15,931

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 9
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Rhode Island Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.36

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 12
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Rhode Island Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $66,758

Rank of State for 2018: 10
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Rhode Island State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,209

Rank of State for 2017: 39
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Rhode Island Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,226

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 12
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,564

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 16

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Rhode Island Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 0.7%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 16
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Rhode Island, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Jack Reed voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Reed also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Reed also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Whitehouse also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Whitehouse also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. David Cicilline voted to restore funds to community schools. Cicilline also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cicilline also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Langevin voted to restore funds to community schools. Langevin also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Langevin also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In RI, voter participation dropped 32 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in RI.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 716,041 in RI.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 223,920 in RI.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 85,321 more people in RI to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
RI General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 437,233 67,058
Presidential Turnout 452,247 91,867
Midterm Turnout 306,960 40,599
# of Drop-Off Voters

145,287 51,268

Gov
Likely D: Raimondo - D

Sen
Solid D: Whitehouse - D

 
 

 
 

RI

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

66 percent of educators and school staff in SC reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 38 percent of SC teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 53 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 81 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 47 percent of SC educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 34 percent of educators in SC said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 16 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 28 percent of educators in SC said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In SC, educators reported getting an average of 6.2 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. SC teachers and school staff also reported an average of 12 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 47 percent of educators in SC agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In SC, 41 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

South Carolina Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $10,512

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 32
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

South Carolina Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.2

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 28
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

South Carolina Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $51,027

Rank of State for 2018: 35
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

South Carolina State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $5,938

Rank of State for 2017: 40
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

South Carolina Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,615

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 9
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,208

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 8

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

South Carolina Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -2.5%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 8
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In South Carolina, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Lindsey Graham voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Graham also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Graham also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Tim Scott voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Scott also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Scott also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. James E. Clyburn did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Clyburn also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did not vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Clyburn opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Jeff Duncan voted not to restore funds to community schools. Duncan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Duncan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Trey Gowdy voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gowdy also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gowdy also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mick Mulvaney did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Mulvaney also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ralph Norman voted not to restore funds to community schools. Norman also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, and supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Norman did not vote on the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Tom Rice voted to restore funds to community schools. Rice also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rice also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark Sanford voted not to restore funds to community schools. Sanford also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sanford also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Joe Wilson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Wilson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Wilson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In SC, voter participation dropped 40 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 7 AFT members running in SC.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 3,097,265 in SC.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 877,491 in SC.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 350,714 more people in SC to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 7-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
SC General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,880,691 277,666
Presidential Turnout 2,109,474 410,709
Midterm Turnout 1,256,308 155,787
# of Drop-Off Voters

853,166 254,922

Gov
Solid R: McMaster - R

 
 

House
Likely R: 01 - Sanford

 
 

SC

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

South Dakota Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,412

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 41
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

South Dakota Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 13.93

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 17
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

South Dakota Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $47,944

Rank of State for 2018: 44
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

South Dakota State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,694

Rank of State for 2017: 24
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

South Dakota Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,446

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 36
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,560

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 3

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

South Dakota Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 5.8%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 3
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In South Dakota, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Mike Rounds voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Rounds also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Rounds also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. John Thune voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Thune also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Thune also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Kristi Noem voted not to restore funds to community schools. Noem also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Noem also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In SD, voter participation dropped 25 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 3 AFT members running in SD.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 555,727 in SD.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 146,996 in SD.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 21,279 more people in SD to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 22-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
SD General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 361,658 71,012
Presidential Turnout 376,376 71,630
Midterm Turnout 284,041 38,551
# of Drop-Off Voters

92,335 33,079

Gov
Solid R: Open

 
 

 
 

 
 

SD

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

70 percent of educators and school staff in TN reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 39 percent of TN teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 61 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 82 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 33 percent of TN educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 39 percent of educators in TN said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 24 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 42 percent of educators in TN said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In TN, educators reported getting an average of 6.6 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. TN teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 42 percent of educators in TN agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In TN, 36 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Tennessee Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,036

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 45
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Tennessee Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.06

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 26
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Tennessee Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $50,900

Rank of State for 2018: 36
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Tennessee State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $9,003

Rank of State for 2017: 13
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Tennessee Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,789

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 23
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,292

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 26

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Tennessee Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -10.1%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 26
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Tennessee, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Lamar Alexander voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Alexander also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Alexander also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Bob Corker voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Corker also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Corker also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Diane Black did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Black also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Black did not vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn voted not to restore funds to community schools. Blackburn also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Blackburn also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Steve Cohen voted to restore funds to community schools. Cohen also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cohen also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Cooper voted to restore funds to community schools. Cooper also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cooper also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Scott DesJarlais voted not to restore funds to community schools. DesJarlais also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. DesJarlais also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John J. Duncan Jr. voted not to restore funds to community schools. Duncan also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Duncan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Chuck Fleischmann voted not to restore funds to community schools. Fleischmann also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Fleischmann also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David Kustoff voted not to restore funds to community schools. Kustoff also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kustoff also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Phil Roe voted not to restore funds to community schools. Roe also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Roe also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In TN, voter participation dropped 43 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 5 AFT members running in TN.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,245,584 in TN.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,037,119 in TN.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 417,473 more people in TN to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
TN General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,269,728 577,345
Presidential Turnout 2,541,410 477,515
Midterm Turnout 1,459,741 175,878
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,081,669 301,637

Gov
Likely R: Open

Sen
Toss Up: Open

 
 

 
 

TN

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

74 percent of educators and school staff in TX reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 33 percent of TX teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 72 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 84 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 39 percent of TX educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 31 percent of educators in TX said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 10 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 39 percent of educators in TX said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In TX, educators reported getting an average of 6.2 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. TX teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 43 percent of educators in TX agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In TX, 38 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Texas Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $9,248

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 42
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Texas Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 15.26

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 29
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Texas Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $53,167

Rank of State for 2018: 29
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Texas State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,393

Rank of State for 2017: 28
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Texas Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,836

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 22
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $2,547

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 46

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Texas Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 1.0%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 46
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Texas, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. John Cornyn voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Cornyn also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Cornyn also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Ted Cruz voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Cruz also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Cruz also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Jodey C. Arrington voted not to restore funds to community schools. Arrington also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Arrington also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Brian Babin voted not to restore funds to community schools. Babin also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Babin also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Joe L. Barton voted not to restore funds to community schools. Barton also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Barton also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kevin Brady voted not to restore funds to community schools. Brady also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brady also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Michael C. Burgess voted not to restore funds to community schools. Burgess also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Burgess also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Carter voted not to restore funds to community schools. Carter also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Carter also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Joaquin Castro voted to restore funds to community schools. Castro also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Castro also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. K. Michael Conaway voted not to restore funds to community schools. Conaway also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Conaway also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Henry Cuellar voted to restore funds to community schools. Cuellar also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cuellar also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Culberson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Culberson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Culberson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lloyd Doggett voted to restore funds to community schools. Doggett also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Doggett also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Blake Farenthold voted not to restore funds to community schools. Farenthold also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Farenthold also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Bill Flores voted not to restore funds to community schools. Flores also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Flores also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Louie Gohmert voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gohmert also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gohmert also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Vicente Gonzalez voted to restore funds to community schools. Gonzalez also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gonzalez also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kay Granger voted not to restore funds to community schools. Granger also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Granger also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Gene Green voted to restore funds to community schools. Green also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Green also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Al Green voted to restore funds to community schools. Green also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Green also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jeb Hensarling voted not to restore funds to community schools. Hensarling also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hensarling also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Will Hurd voted to restore funds to community schools. Hurd also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Hurd also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee voted to restore funds to community schools. Jackson Lee also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jackson Lee also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Sam Johnson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Johnson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson voted to restore funds to community schools. Johnson also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Kenny Marchant voted not to restore funds to community schools. Marchant also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Marchant also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Michael McCaul voted not to restore funds to community schools. McCaul also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McCaul also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Beto O'Rourke voted to restore funds to community schools. O'Rourke also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. O'Rourke also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Pete Olson voted not to restore funds to community schools. Olson also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Olson also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ted Poe voted not to restore funds to community schools. Poe also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Poe also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. John Ratcliffe voted not to restore funds to community schools. Ratcliffe also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ratcliffe also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Pete Sessions voted not to restore funds to community schools. Sessions also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sessions also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Lamar Smith voted to restore funds to community schools. Smith also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Smith did not vote on the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy

Rep. Mac Thornberry voted not to restore funds to community schools. Thornberry also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Thornberry also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Marc Veasey voted to restore funds to community schools. Veasey also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Veasey also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Filemon Vela voted to restore funds to community schools. Vela also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Vela also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Randy Weber voted not to restore funds to community schools. Weber also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Weber also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Roger Williams voted not to restore funds to community schools. Williams also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Williams also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In TX, voter participation dropped 47 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 1 AFT members running in TX.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 14,657,580 in TX.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 4,449,344 in TX.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 2,351,065 more people in TX to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 9-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
TX General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 9,818,262 1,533,690
Presidential Turnout 8,891,719 1,905,243
Midterm Turnout 4,710,319 575,024
# of Drop-Off Voters

4,181,400 1,330,219

Gov
Solid R: Abbott - R

Sen
Likely R: Cruz - R

House
Republican Toss Up: 07 - Culberson
Lean R: 23 - Hurd / 32 - Sessions
Likely R: 21 - Open

 
 

TX

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

63 percent of educators and school staff in UT reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 25 percent of UT teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 69 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 81 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 63 percent of UT educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 75 percent of educators in UT said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 25 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 25 percent of educators in UT said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In UT, educators reported getting an average of 6.8 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. UT teachers and school staff also reported an average of 14 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 44 percent of educators in UT agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In UT, 50 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Utah Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $7,132

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 51
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Utah Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 22.85

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 49
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Utah Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $47,604

Rank of State for 2018: 48
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Utah State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,310

Rank of State for 2017: 30
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Utah Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $6,788

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 49
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,753

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 34

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Utah Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -9.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 34
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Utah, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Orrin G. Hatch voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Hatch also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Hatch also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Mike Lee voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Lee also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Lee also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Rob Bishop voted not to restore funds to community schools. Bishop also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Bishop also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Chaffetz also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Chaffetz supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. John Curtis did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Curtis also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Curtis was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy.

Reps. Mia Love & Chris Stewart voted not to restore funds to community schools. Both senators also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In UT, voter participation dropped 48 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 8 AFT members running in UT.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,671,003 in UT.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 370,369 in UT.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 299,672 more people in UT to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 30-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
UT General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 1,283,738 279,004
Presidential Turnout 1,138,951 249,956
Midterm Turnout 590,636 85,487
# of Drop-Off Voters

548,315 164,469

 
 

Sen
Solid R: Open - R

House
Lean R: 04 - Love

Ballot
Choice Amendment

UT

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Vermont Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $18,332

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 5
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Vermont Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 10.54

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 1
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Vermont Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $58,527

Rank of State for 2018: 16
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Vermont State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $4,016

Rank of State for 2017: 48
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Vermont Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $16,043

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 2
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,980

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 1

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Vermont Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 4.2%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 1
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Vermont, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Patrick J. Leahy voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Leahy also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Leahy also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Bernie Sanders voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Sanders also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Sanders also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Peter Welch voted to restore funds to community schools. Welch also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Welch also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In VT, voter participation dropped 38 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in VT.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 485,010 in VT.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 114,804 in VT.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 40,215 more people in VT to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 6-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
VT General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 352,425 66,758
Presidential Turnout 313,353 56,533
Midterm Turnout 195,648 20,476
# of Drop-Off Voters

117,705 36,057

Gov
Likely R: Scott - R

Sen
Solid D: Sanders - D

 
 

 
 

VT

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

80 percent of educators and school staff in VA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 42 percent of VA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 68 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 85 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 28 percent of VA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 22 percent of educators in VA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 7 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 45 percent of educators in VA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In VA, educators reported getting an average of 6.4 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. VA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 16 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 47 percent of educators in VA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In VA, 44 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Virginia Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,726

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 25
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Virginia Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.22

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 21
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Virginia Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $51,265

Rank of State for 2018: 34
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Virginia State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,524

Rank of State for 2017: 36
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Virginia Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $12,820

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 7
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,127

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 9

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Virginia Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -4.9%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 9
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Virginia, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Tim Kaine voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Kaine also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Kaine also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Mark Warner voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Warner also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Warner also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Donald S. Beyer Jr. voted not to restore funds to community schools. Beyer also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Beyer also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Dave Brat did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Brat also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Brat also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Barbara Comstock voted not to restore funds to community schools. Comstock also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Comstock also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Gerald E. Connolly voted to restore funds to community schools. Connolly also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Connolly also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Tom Garrett did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Garrett also did not vote on funding for professional development and class-size reduction and did not vote on changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack. Garrett was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act.

Rep. Robert W. Goodlatte voted not to restore funds to community schools. Goodlatte also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Goodlatte also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Morgan Griffith voted not to restore funds to community schools. Griffith also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Griffith also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. A. Donald McEachin voted to restore funds to community schools. McEachin also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McEachin also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Robert C. Scott voted to restore funds to community schools. Scott also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Scott also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Scott Taylor voted to restore funds to community schools. Taylor also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Taylor also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Rob Wittman voted not to restore funds to community schools. Wittman also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Wittman also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In VA, voter participation dropped 45 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 11 AFT members running in VA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 5,198,321 in VA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,617,100 in VA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 1,106,287 more people in VA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 15-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
VA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 3,262,309 572,729
Presidential Turnout 3,953,662 879,817
Midterm Turnout 2,180,837 297,641
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,772,825 582,176

 
 

Sen
Solid D: Kaine - D

House
Republican Toss Up: 10 - Comstock
Lean R: 02 - Taylor / 05 - Open / 07 - Brat

 
 

VA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

75 percent of educators and school staff in WA reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 38 percent of WA teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 70 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 95 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 41 percent of WA educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 34 percent of educators in WA said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 23 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 45 percent of educators in WA said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In WA, educators reported getting an average of 6.5 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. WA teachers and school staff also reported an average of 13 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 46 percent of educators in WA agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In WA, 38 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Washington Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,830

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 22
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Washington Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 18.76

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 46
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Washington Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $55,175

Rank of State for 2018: 25
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Washington State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $7,809

Rank of State for 2017: 22
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Washington Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $9,480

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 26
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,376

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 23

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Washington Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -5.7%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 23
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Washington, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sens. Maria Cantwell & Patty Murray voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Both senators also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Both also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Suzan DelBene & Denny Heck voted to restore funds to community schools. Both representatives also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler voted to restore funds to community schools. Beutler also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Beutler also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Pramila Jayapal voted to restore funds to community schools. Jayapal also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jayapal also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Derek Kilmer & Rick Larsen voted to restore funds to community schools. Both representatives also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers voted not to restore funds to community schools. Rodgers also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Rodgers also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In WA, voter participation dropped 37 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in WA.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,427,936 in WA.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 1,328,784 in WA.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 485,577 more people in WA to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 8-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
WA General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 2,830,237 473,370
Presidential Turnout 3,313,920 702,719
Midterm Turnout 2,103,624 291,099
# of Drop-Off Voters

1,210,296 411,620

 
 

Sen
Solid D: Cantwell - D

House
Republican Toss Up: 08 - Open
Lean R: 05 - McMorris, Rogers
Likely R: 03 - Herrera Beutler

 
 

WA

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

83 percent of educators and school staff in WV reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 49 percent of WV teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 68 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 84 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 37 percent of WV educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 43 percent of educators in WV said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 25 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 46 percent of educators in WV said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In WV, educators reported getting an average of 6.2 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. WV teachers and school staff also reported an average of 15 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 37 percent of educators in WV agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In WV, 33 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

West Virginia Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,581

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 27
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

West Virginia Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.11

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 19
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

West Virginia Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $45,642

Rank of State for 2018: 50
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

West Virginia State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,909

Rank of State for 2017: 31
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

West Virginia Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $7,887

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 42
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,299

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 25

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

West Virginia Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 1.2%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 25
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In West Virginia, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Joe Manchin III voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Manchin also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Manchin also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Moore Capito also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Moore Capito also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Evan Jenkins voted not to restore funds to community schools. Jenkins also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Jenkins also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. David B. McKinley voted not to restore funds to community schools. McKinley also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. McKinley also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Alex X. Mooney voted not to restore funds to community schools. Mooney also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Mooney also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In WV, voter participation dropped 38 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in WV.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 1,230,932 in WV.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 327,091 in WV.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 107,180 more people in WV to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 16-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
WV General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 863,379 115,365
Presidential Turnout 712,292 132,252
Midterm Turnout 444,412 46,622
# of Drop-Off Voters

267,880 85,630

 
 

Sen
Toss up: Manchin

House
Likely R: 03 - Open

 
 

WV

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

74 percent of educators and school staff in WI reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 35 percent of WI teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 84 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 94 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 65 percent of WI educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 55 percent of educators in WI said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 16 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 45 percent of educators in WI said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In WI, educators reported getting an average of 6.7 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. WI teachers and school staff also reported an average of 18 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 32 percent of educators in WI agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In WI, 45 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Wisconsin Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $11,750

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 24
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Wisconsin Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 14.91

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 24
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Wisconsin Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $55,895

Rank of State for 2018: 24
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Wisconsin State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $6,858

Rank of State for 2017: 32
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Wisconsin Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,962

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 30
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $4,394

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 21

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Wisconsin Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: -9.8%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 21
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Wisconsin, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. Tammy Baldwin voted against repealing the Affordable Care Act. Baldwin also voted no to the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, opposed the tax plan and opposed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Baldwin also voted no to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Ron Johnson voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Johnson also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Johnson also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Sean P. Duffy voted not to restore funds to community schools. Duffy also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Duffy also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mike Gallagher voted not to restore funds to community schools. Gallagher also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Gallagher also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Glenn Grothman voted not to restore funds to community schools. Grothman also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Grothman also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Ron Kind voted to restore funds to community schools. Kind also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Kind also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Gwen Moore voted to restore funds to community schools. Moore also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, opposed the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Moore also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Mark Pocan voted to restore funds to community schools. Pocan also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, (was in favor of) the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and opposed the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Pocan also opposed changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Paul D. Ryan voted not to restore funds to community schools. Ryan also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Ryan also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner voted not to restore funds to community schools. Sensenbrenner also voted against cutting funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Sensenbrenner also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In WI, voter participation dropped 19 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in WI.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 4,223,637 in WI.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 368,167 in WI.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 319,113 more people in WI to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 17-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
WI General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 4,132,355 545,796
Presidential Turnout 2,964,011 442,562
Midterm Turnout 2,402,468 322,558
# of Drop-Off Voters

561,543 120,004

Gov
Lean R: Walker - R

Sen
Likely D: Baldwin - D

House
Lean R: 01 - Open
Likely R: 06 - Grothman

 
 

WI

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

Wyoming Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $16,864

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 7
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

Wyoming Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.38

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 8
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

Wyoming Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $58,578

Rank of State for 2018: 15
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

Wyoming State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $16,643

Rank of State for 2017: 3
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Wyoming Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $5,217

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 51
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: $3,154

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018: 41

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

Wyoming Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 6.6%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 41
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In Wyoming, senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your state’s senators and representatives vote?

Sen. John Barrasso voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Barrasso also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Barrasso also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Sen. Michael B. Enzi voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Enzi also voted yes on the Republican/Trump proposed budget cuts, supported the tax plan and backed Betsy DeVos’ nomination. Enzi also voted yes to ending requirements that would remove the incentive for companies to pay workers fairly and protect their health and safety.

Rep. Liz Cheney voted not to restore funds to community schools. Cheney also voted to cut funding for professional development and class-size reduction, was in favor of the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy and supported the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Cheney also supported changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In WY, voter participation dropped 33 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in WY.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 373,465 in WY.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 26,251 in WY.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get more people in WY to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 22-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
WY General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 371,720 54,123
Presidential Turnout 254,753 30,412
Midterm Turnout 171,240 16,268
# of Drop-Off Voters

83,513 14,144

Gov
Solid R: Open - R

Sen
Solid R: Barrasso - R

 
 

 
 

WY

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, conducted by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

84 percent of educators and school staff in DC reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Respect

While educators felt most respected by colleagues, students and parents, 57 percent of DC teachers and school staff did not feel treated with respect by their local school boards. 73 percent did not feel respected by state and federal elected officials, and a whopping 89 percent did not feel respected by U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

Influence and Control at Work

Educators report feeling they have some control over a number of day-to-day classroom-level decisions, but they report having less influence over policy decisions. Only 32 percent of DC educators felt they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in establishing curriculum, with the remainder reporting they had only “minor influence” or “no influence” over such decisions. 38 percent of educators in DC said they had either “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in setting performance standards for students. Just 19 percent of respondents said they had “moderate” or “a great deal” of influence in deciding how their school budgets will be spent. When they need additional resources to do their jobs, 51 percent of educators in DC said they are not able to get them.

Well-Being and Work-Life Balance

Nationally, our survey indicated that educators’ physical and mental health is more likely to suffer than other U.S. workers. Stressors facing teachers and school staff in our survey included heavy workloads and lack of sleep.

In DC, educators reported getting an average of 6.3 hours of sleep per night — less than the seven to eight nightly hours recommended for adults. DC teachers and school staff also reported an average of 19 days per month when they worked hours beyond their regular schedules.

Mentoring for New Teachers

Our broader survey results indicate that strong labor-management partnerships may reduce educator stress, and educators in districts with robust labor-management collaboration were more likely to agree that their schools had good mentoring programs in place, especially for new teachers, possibly reducing stress and turnover. Only 22 percent of educators in DC agreed that their schools had a good mentoring program, especially for new teachers.

Bullying and Harassment

The survey showed that educators are much more likely to be bullied, harassed and threatened at work than other U.S. workers. Over a quarter of our national random sample of AFT members and over 40 percent of our public survey respondent group reported having been bullied, harassed or threatened at work in the past 12 months.

In DC, 54 percent of teachers and school staff reported being threatened, bullied or harassed at work within the past year. In contrast, national data from 2015 show that only 7 percent of employed adults in the United States report experiencing bullying, harassment or threats at work.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

District of Columbia Per-Pupil Spending K-12

Per-Pupil Spending 2015-2016: $19,651

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 2
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

Source: Data on per-pupil spending for 2016 are from the U.S. census and are adjusted to reflect 2017 dollars.

District of Columbia Student-Teacher Ratio

2015-2016 Student Teacher Ratio: 12.38

Rank of State for 2015-2016: 8
(1st corresponds to states with least number of students per teacher; 51st corresponds to states with greatest number of students per teacher.)

Source: Data on pupil-teacher ratio are from National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data (CCD), "State Nonfiscal Public Elementary/Secondary Education Survey."

District of Columbia Average Teacher Pay for 2018

Average Teacher Pay for 2018: $76,486

Rank of State for 2018: 4
(1st corresponds to highest average salary; 51st corresponds to lowest average salary.)

Source: Data on average teacher salary are from the National Education Association, "Rankings of the States 2017 and Estimates of School Statistics 2018."

District of Columbia State Support for Higher Education

State Support for Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017: $11,519

Rank of State for 2017: 6
(1st corresponds to highest level of state support; 51st corresponds to lowest level of state support.)

District of Columbia Cost of Higher Education per Full-Time Enrollees for 2017-2018

Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: $8,060

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Four-Year College, for 2017-2018: 39
(1st corresponds to most expensive; 51st corresponds to least expensive.)

Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018:  

Rank of State for Cost of Higher Education, Two-Year College, for 2017-2018:

Source: Data on college prices are from the College Board’s "Trends in College Pricing," Table 5: Average Published Tuition and Fees at Public Institutions by State in 2017 Dollars.

District of Columbia Tax Effort

Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015: 2.4%

Rank of State for Change in Tax Effort between 2008 and 2015:
(1st corresponds to most improvement; 51st corresponds to largest decline.)

Source: Tax effort for each state is calculated by dividing total state and local tax revenue per capita by total taxable resources per capita. Data on total state and local tax revenue are from the U.S. Census Bureau, and data on total taxable resources are from the U.S. Department of Treasury.

Elections Matter for Legislation

In D.C., senators and representatives cast votes on critical issues such as funding for education and community schools; whether the Affordable Care Act should be repealed; tax cuts that benefit the wealthiest Americans and corporations while depleting resources for programs aimed at the needs of the middle class; and whether Betsy DeVos is fit to be secretary of education.

How did your representative vote?

Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton did not vote in the decision to restore funds to community schools. Norton also did not cast votes on funding for professional development and class-size reduction, the Trump/Republican tax cuts for the wealthy, the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, and changes to the National Labor Relations Board that will hurt workers’ ability to organize as part of the Janus v. AFSCME attack.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. In DC, voter participation dropped 42 percent from 2014 to 2016. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in DC.

Rising American Electorate

  • The “Rising American Electorate”—unmarried women, millennials, African-Americans, Latinos and all other people of color—now accounts for 59.2 percent of the voting-eligible population in this country—roughly 584,941 in DC.
  • Millennials (35 years old and under) will be the largest voting-eligible population, representing 32 percent, or 139,066 in DC.
  • From gun violence to student debt to healthcare costs and access, polling indicates the Rising American Electorate supports a working families agenda that moves our country in the right direction.
  • By engaging with the Rising American Electorate on these issues, we can get 114,826 more people in DC to vote this year then would vote in a typical midterm election.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 6-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
DC General Public Millennials
# of Unregistered Voters 415,325 72,397
Presidential Turnout 308,685 68,317
Midterm Turnout 178,034 45,647
# of Drop-Off Voters

130,651 22,670

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

DC

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

We're still gathering data for this selection.
Check back at http://aft.org/map2018 after Convention.

Elections Matter for Legislation

Federal Disaster Assistance to Puerto Rico for Relief and Recovery after the Hurricanes

In February 2018, Congress provided $89.3 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to help states, communities, businesses and individuals respond to and recover from recent hurricanes, wildfires and other disasters.

Much of this money is still being allocated. Here are some highlights of federal money that has been delivered so far to Puerto Rico specifically to help rebuild and recover after the hurricanes:

Education: $589 million from the U.S. Department of Education’s Immediate Aid to Restart School Operations program, to the Puerto Rico Department of Education.

Medicaid: $4.9 billion to increase Medicaid caps for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands for two years, along with program requirements. In addition, 100 percent of the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage is applied to these funds, meaning that Puerto Rico does not need to provide its own funding to match this amount from the federal government.

Emergency Recovery: As of May 30, the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Public Assistance program has approved $2.2 billion to help the government of Puerto Rico and municipalities with debris removal and emergency protective measures, including:

  • More than $388 million to the Puerto Rico Department of Housing for emergency protective measures.
  • Grants to six municipalities for debris removal:
    • $8 million to the municipality of Toa Alta
    • $2.8 million to the municipality of Guaynabo
    • $2.7 million to the municipality of Mayagüez
    • $2.4 million to the municipality of Barranquitas
    • $2.2 million to the municipality of Corozal
    • $1.7 million to the municipality of Maricao.
  • $3.1 million to the Puerto Rico Public Housing Administration for group sheltering.
  • $1.4 million to the Metropolitan Bus Authority for emergency protective measures.
  • $1.1 billion in grants for individuals and families. This includes approval of nearly $620 million for housing repairs and nearly $510 million for other needs, such as personal property losses, damaged or destroyed vehicles, and disaster-related medical, dental, funeral and child care costs.

Housing: $104 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to the Puerto Rico Public Housing Administration to finance and modernize public housing on the island.

Health: $52 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration to support health centers on the island.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Political Power Building Goal

  • Elevate working families' values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning gubernatorial, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

While Puerto Rico does not have any election this year, we must continue to engage our members and the general public to build power for working people and fight to defend public education. And, as the island continues to recover, we cannot let those in power use the hurricane to line the pockets of their friends by giving away the resources our kids need to thrive. We can stop privatization of and disinvestment from public education in Puerto Rico.

While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve. If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, we can shift power from the elite to regular working people.

As we continue to work to recover from the hurricane, we must also remember that many of our friends and family will be voting at new addresses and maybe in new states. While we may not be voting in Puerto Rico, we can call our friends and family living in the 50 states and urge them to register and vote this year in their local elections. They can help elect a Congress that treats Puerto Rico fairly and helps provide the support it needs to rebuild after Hurricane Maria. It’s part of our duty for our students' futures.

PR

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

We're still gathering data for this selection.
Check back at http://aft.org/map2018 after Convention.

Elections Matter for Legislation

Federal Assistance to Guam

Despite investing in military construction in Guam, the Trump Administration’s budget cuts would hurt working families by decimating federal funding. His proposed budged would have included drastic cuts in discretionary spending.

Fortunately, through advocacy by AFT and others, we were able to beat back many of the cuts. For fiscal year 2018, Guam received at total of $46,839,828 in elementary and secondary education and $16,474,226 in higher education aid from the federal government.

Here are some highlights:

Elementary and Secondary Programs
Title I$20,936,271
Title II (supporting Effective instruction)$3,877,822
Impact Aid$6,383,000
21st Century Grants$1,471,992
Rural & Low Income$809,126
Student Support/Reading Enrichment$1,847,391
English Language Acquisition$1,340,535
Homeless$29,594
Special Education(grants to states)$14,120,991
Special Education (infants and children)$1,520,218
Career and Technical education$673,150
Higher Education Programs
Federal Pell Grants$15,700,000
Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity
Grants$250,396
Federal Work-Study$526,830
Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants$2,938,405

Medicaid

There are no deductibles or co-payments under the Guam Medicaid program and it does not administer a Medicare Part D Plan; the program receives an additional grant through the Enhanced Allotment Plan (EAP) which must be utilized solely for the distribution of Part D medications.

For the perod of July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2019, Guam received an additional $268,343,113 in Medicaid funding.

As of January 2015, 38,482 people are enrolled in the Medicaid and CHIP program in Guam.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in GU.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 3-Nov-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
Guam General Public
Presidential Turnout 35,854
Midterm Turnout 37,373
# of Drop-Off Voters

N/A

Gov
Open - R

House
GU-01: Bordallo - D

Leg
Guam Legistlature

GU

Educator Quality of Work Life

In 2017, the American Federation of Teachers and the Badass Teachers Association ran a 30-question survey of teachers and school staff nationwide on the quality of their work life. Like its predecessor, run by the AFT and the BATs in 2015, the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey demonstrates that schools still struggle to provide educators and, by extension, students with healthy and productive environments.

Roughly two-thirds of our national sample of AFT educators reported that work is “often” or “always” stressful. Districts that fail to recognize the importance of educator well-being may be faced with higher turnover, more teacher and staff health issues, and greater burnout, all of which leads to higher costs, less stability for kids and, ultimately, lower student achievement.

Learn more about the 2017 Educator Quality of Work Life Survey and see the full report on the national data at https://www.aft.org/2017-eqwl

School Funding

We're still gathering data for this selection.
Check back at http://aft.org/map2018 after Convention.

Elections Matter for Legislation

Federal Disaster Assistance to the U.S. Virgin Islands for Relief and Recovery after the Hurricanes

In February 2018, due to advocacy by the American Federation of Teachers and other allies, Congress provided $89.3 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations to help states, communities, businesses and individuals respond to and recover from recent hurricanes, wildfires and other disasters.

Much of this money is still being allocated. Here are some highlights of federal money that has been delivered so far to the U.S. Virgin Islands specifically to help rebuild and recover after the hurricanes:

Education: $13 million from the U.S. Department of Education’s Immediate Aid to Restart School Operations program to help restart schools in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Medicaid: $4.9 billion to increase Medicaid caps for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands for two years, along with program requirements. In addition, 100 percent of the Federal Medical Assistance Percentage is applied to these funds, meaning that Puerto Rico does not need to provide its own funding to match this amount from the federal government.

Housing:

  • $9 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for the development, financing and modernization of public housing developments and management improvement.
  • $186.7 million from Federal Emergency Management Agency for the U.S. Virgin Islands Housing Finance Authority to provide emergency repair work in homes throughout the territory.

Emergency Recovery: The U.S. Small Businesses Administration has approved more than $515 million to homeowners, renters and business owners in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

How We Can Shift the Next Election

Election Goals

  • Elevate working families’ values and issues by helping members exercise their voice at the ballot box.
  • Win control of at least one chamber of Congress, putting a check on the extremist policies of Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos.
  • Build long-term power in states by winning governor, state legislative, local and ballot races across the country.

How We Win

Voting historically drops off between a presidential election year and a nonpresidential election year. While AFT members usually turn out in higher numbers than the general public, we still have room to improve.

If we increase voter registration and turnout by 5 percent among our members, the people they live with, and what’s known as the "Rising American Electorate" (unmarried women, young voters and people of color), we can shift power at the local, state and federal levels from the elite to regular working people.

AFT Members

More than 300 AFT members nationally have stepped up and are running for office this election. There are 0 AFT members running in US VI.

Election Snapshot

Important Dates

  • National Voter Registration Day: 25-Sep-18
  • Voter Registration Deadline: 5-Oct-18
  • General Election: 6-Nov-18
US VI General Public
# of Unregistered Voters 48,723
Presidential Turnout 20,967
Midterm Turnout 27,897
# of Drop-Off Voters

N/A

Gov
Mapp - I

House
Plaskett - D

Leg
Legislature of the Virgin Islands

VI

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