American Educator: Summer 2004

  • Bridging the Gap between Poor and Privileged

    How the Parent-Child Home Program Uses Books and Toys to Help Poor Toddlers Succeed in Kindergarten and Beyond

    Last spring, American Educator published research by Betty Hart and Todd Risley showing that, on average, low income parents spoke much less to their children (and spoke to them about a narrower range of topics using a smaller vocabulary) than did their higher-income counterparts....

  • Bring PCHP to Your Community

    The model for the Parent-Child Home Program (PCHP) was developed by Phyllis Levenstein for her doctoral dissertation in the 1960s, based on her theory that the most effective way to reduce high school dropout rates—and thus break the cycle of poverty—would be to...

  • Legislating Jim Crow

    In the hundred years that took this country from Reconstruction to the civil rights movement, more than 400 Jim Crow state laws, state constitutional amendments, and city ordinances were passed.* This legislation not only sanctioned racism...

  • Teachers' Roles in Ending School Segregation

    Teacher Salary Equalization Was Early Goal of NAACP

    In the 1940s and 1950s, John Henry McCray was publisher and editor of the Lighthouse and Informer, the leading black weekly newspaper in South Carolina. Here is his first-person account of a salary equalization suit...

  • Teaching about Brown

    From the avalanche of materials marking Brown's 50th anniversary, we chose these as favorite resources for K–12 teachers.

    Books

    Adult and Advanced High School

    Brown v. Board of Education: Caste, Culture, and the Constitution, by Robert J...

  • The Decline of the Idea of Caste

    Setting the Stage for Brown v. Board of Education Robert J. Cottrol, Raymond T. Diamond, and Leland B. Ware

    Fifty years ago—on May 17, 1954, to be precise—the Supreme Court published its decision in Brown v. Board of Education. By doing so, the high Court gave a tremendous boost to the modern civil rights movement that forever changed American race relations. The decision, authored by...

  • NAACP v. Jim Crow

    The Legal Strategy That Brought Down "Separate but Equal" by Toppling School Segregation Robert J. Cottrol, Raymond T. Diamond, and Leland B. Ware

    The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) was formed in 1909 to fight Jim Crow, 20th-century America's experience with petty and not so petty apartheid. Under the leadership of W.E.B. Du Bois, the NAACP would take the bully pulpit to push for the abolition of...

  • Jim Crow's Schools

    Peter Irons

    In 1890, the Louisiana legislature passed a "separate railroad cars" law, stating that "no person or persons shall be permitted to occupy seats in coaches, other than the ones assigned to them on account of the race they belong to." The law required railroads to provide "equal but separate"...

  • Magic Casements

    Books for Kids That Stand the Test of Time Terri Schmitz

    One of my most vivid childhood memories is of reading Eleanor Farjeon's entrancing introduction to her short story collection The Little Bookroom (1955). She described growing up in a house filled with reading material, where "it would have been more natural to live without clothes than...

  • Ask the Cognitive Scientist

    The Privileged Status of Story

    How does the mind work—and especially how does it learn? Teachers' instructional decisions are based on a mix of theories from teacher education, trial and error, craft knowledge, and gut instinct. Such gut knowledge often serves us well, but is there anything sturdier to rely on?...