AFT - American Federation of Teachers

Shortcut Navigation:
 
Email ShareThis

Press Release

 

FOR RELEASE:
July 13, 2014

 

CONTACT:

Marcus Mrowka
202-879-4447
202-531-0689 (cell)
mmrowka@aft.org

 

AFT Members Pass Resolution to Fulfill Promise and Potential of Common Core, Lay Out Action Plan to Fix Botched Implementation

LOS ANGELES— AFT members today passed a resolution at the union's national convention reaffirming the AFT's support for the promise and potential of the Common Core State Standards as a way to ensure all children have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in the 21st century while sharply criticizing the standards' botched implementation. The AFT's resolution lays out key actions needed to restore confidence in the standards and provide educators, parents and students with the tools and supports they need to make the standards work in the classroom.

The resolution, "Role of Standards in Public Education," resolution passed following an intense, extended debate on the convention floor. Educators expressed their frustrations and anger with how the standards were developed and rolled out, without sufficient input from those closest to the classroom and without the tools and resources educators need to make the transition to the new rigorous standards, even as states and districts rushed to test and hold teachers and students accountable. AFT members also voiced their distrust of efforts by those seeking to make a profit off the new standards. No matter where members stood on the issue, there was clear anger over the deprofessionalization of teachers throughout the implementation process. At the same time, however, many educators shared how they've witnessed, when done right, how these standards move from rote memorization to provide children with the deeper learning the standards were designed to produce and that the standards remain the best way to level the playing field for all children. Proponents of the resolution made clear that it offers solutions to fix the poor implementation and includes a call for greater teacher voice.

"We heard a lot of passion today—all in support of student needs and teacher professionalism," said AFT President Randi Weingarten. "And where our members ended up is that we will continue to support the promise and potential of these standards as an essential to tool to provide each and every child an equitable and excellent education while calling on the powers that be in districts and, states and at the national level to work with educators and parents to fix this botched implementation and restore confidence in the standards. And no matter which side of the debate our members were on, there's one thing everyone agreed on—that we need to delink these standards from the tests."

The resolution lays out key action steps the AFT is taking to make the standards work for kids and educators, including:

  • • Rejecting low-level standardized testing in favor of assessments aligned with rich curricula that encourage the kind of higher-order thinking and performance skills students need;
  • • Supporting efforts by affiliates to hold policymakers and administrators accountable for proper implementation;
  • • Advocating that each state create an independent board composed of a majority representation of teachers and education professionals to monitor the implementation of the standards;
  • • Fighting to ensure that educators are involved in a cohesive plan for engaging stakeholders, and, that they have a significant role in the implementation and evaluation of the standards in their schools, and that there are adequate funds provided by all levels of government to ensure successful implementation of the standards; and
  • • Reaffirming the call the AFT made more than a year ago for a moratorium on the high-stakes consequences of Common Core-aligned assessments for students, teachers and schools until all of the essential elements of a standards-based system are in place.

"What educators and parents are saying is,: 'Yes, we want our children to have the knowledge and skills they need for life, college, career and citizenship.' But to make that a reality, our voices need to be involved in a meaningful way, and we actually have to focus on the learning, and not the obsession with testing," said Weingarten.

 

Follow AFT President Randi Weingarten: http://twitter.com/rweingarten


# # # #


The AFT represents 1.6 million pre-K through 12th-grade teachers; paraprofessionals and other school-related personnel; higher education faculty and professional staff; federal, state and local government employees; nurses and healthcare workers; and early childhood educators.